Last-Minute Holiday Book Sales Strategies From the Writers in the Storm Blog

Penny Sansevieri

Yes, the holidays are upon us, but that doesn’t mean you’ve missed all your opportunities to sell a few more books before 2020.

Photo Credit: olegkrugllyak, Deposit Photos

I’ve collected a list of important dates and strategies that work really well with the amount of time we have left and I encourage you to work in as many as you can—you’ll be glad you did when you’re relaxing, happily sipping eggnog and sales keep coming in!

Offer Free Holiday Shipping

Amazon has spoiled most consumers for shipping charges. Customers flat-out don’t like to pay shipping charges anymore. Because shipping costs have increased, it’s become increasingly important for every other online store to follow suit.

If you do sell books from your site, I encourage you to eliminate shipping costs during December. If you temporarily eliminate shipping costs, announce the start and stop dates to your email list and on social media.

To add sparkle to this offer, let buyers know that you personally autograph books for recipients, which makes wonderfully personalized holiday gifts!

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Start with Your Accordion Mostly Closed – From The Book Designer Blog

By Beth Barany

Elevator pitches–not just for marketing… Today, Beth Barany provides us with a different perspective on elevator pitches, those one paragraph synopses we should all be writing for our books, how to write them and how to use them. Lots of great information. I think you’ll enjoy it.


 
When I was starting on my path as a novelist, I just dove right in, but I had no idea what I was doing. It was scary but I was determined to stick with it, no matter what.

Soon I found roadmaps of sorts to guide me along my way. I didn’t know if these “how to” guides would get me to The End but I persisted.

Novel #1

My roadmap for my first novel was The Weekend Novelist by Robert J. Ray. Divided into 52 lessons, I was able to go through this book, complete the assignments, and make progress on my novel.

By the time I finished my first novel, I was determined to find a better way to write a novel. It took me 5 years to get to The End.

5 years, really? I mean, there had to be more direct routes to get to my destination of a finished first draft. (Though I know it took the time it took because learning, and life.)

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Publish Your Book In Multiple Versions – From the Book Marketing Buzz Blog

Can your book appear in 10 other forms? Yes, and then some. Here are some versions to consider:

  1. Limited Edition – only so many are printed and no re-prints are made.
  2. Deluxe Edition – the book is printed on special paper, the cover may have a special binding and feel, and it may come with something extra, like a DVD.
  3. Hardcore Trade Edition – hardcover book, typically 6 x 9.
  4. Trade Paperback – paperback book, typically 5.5 x 8.5.
  5. Mass Market Paperback – smaller paperback book, usually 4 x 6.
  6. Textbook Edition – enhance your book to look more like a textbook, with an index, list of resources, bibliography, study questions, etc.
  7. Comic Book – adapt your book into a comic book, replete with illustrations and minimal text.
  8. Book Digest – shortened version of your book, either with fewer chapters or shorter, condensed chapters.
  9. Premium – book is slightly changed to meet the needs of a specific company or organization that buys the book in bulk quantity.
  10. Series – create other books along the same theme as the first.
  11. Revised or Annual Edition – add a chapter or two, update your info, and boom, you have a new book.
  12. Audiobook.

Read the rest of this post HERE.

5 Ways To Stand Out As An Author On Social Media – From the Creative Penn Blog

5 Ways To Stand Out As An Author On Social Media

It can be overwhelming for authors to manage all that’s involved in marketing our books. In this article, Eevi Jones shares five easy ways to make the most of your social media branding so that those accounts are doing some of the work for you.

Promoting and marketing ourselves is quite a challenge for most of us authors.

And although it’s so very important, we often don’t have the time, or we simply don’t want to seem too pushy.

That’s why it’s all the more important to take advantage of all the opportunities that present themselves in our everyday lives, but are so often overlooked by most.

In this article, I will show you 5 simple changes you can make today, that can have such a huge impact for you and is such a quick and amazing win. Everyone here can do this within minutes. This is how so many of my clients have found me, my books, and my programs!

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Penny Sansevieri’s Top Book Marketing Complaints – From the Writers in the Storm Blog

Publishing a book is a big deal. But, as authors, you already know that it requires an investment not just in time, but in your money. From editing to book cover design and, of course, your marketing efforts, it’s important to you to maximize that investment. And it should be.

And, as with all things, there are good ways to invest in your book promotion and, the flip side, not-so-good ways.  Believe me, in nearly two decades in the book marketing business, I’ve heard it all, both from authors I work with and those I meet at industry events. And so, as a cautionary tale, I’m sharing the top complaints I hear from authors in the industry, and what you can do instead or to circumvent each problem altogether. 

Some of the ways we can avoid these issues may be fairly obvious to most people. For one, any agreements you sign should clearly state any deliverables. Similarly, if anyone makes any big promises like “bestseller status,” don’t walk, run away. No one can guarantee that. Outside of those big-ticket ideas, here are some of the biggest complaints in the book marketing industry.

Read the rest of this post HERE.

Book Promotion: Do This, Not That – March 2019 – From The Book Designer Blog

By Amy Collins

Unless you’ve been living in the back of a cave for the last few months, you know that there has been a lot of changes to how Amazon handles their customer reviews. At the same time, getting reviews onto Amazon and into the GoodReads system is more important than ever.

What do authors do now that it is harder than ever to encourage your readers and genre fans to write reviews? There is now an enormous chasm between an author’s needs for reviews and a reader’s comfort level with writing reviews…

I have interviewed Sandra Beckwith about her experiences, guidance, and help with getting reader reviews posted and accepted. This month, DO THIS NOT THAT is all about READER REVIEWS.

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Beat the Author Blues: How to Manage Writer’s Doubt – From the Written Word Media Blog

  • by Clayton Noblit

Being an author is hard. There’s no way around it. Some days, the prose will spring onto the page almost without effort. On others, it will be an exercise in stagnation and frustration as you stare at a blank screen in a fit of writer’s doubt. Oh, and the actual writing often isn’t the hard part. Authors and writers often work from a deeply personal place. And, if opening up to a new friend is anxiety-inducing, sharing your writing with the entire world takes it to a new level.

Think running a business is hard? Imagine if the business was based around your imagination being shared with others. This is what an author deals with on a daily basis. Thankfully, there are upsides to bring an author. Sharing your creativity can be the most rewarding thing in your life. It’s a chance few will take, but those who do can see great rewards.

Here are a few common issues that authors face, and suggestions on how to overcome them, or put them in perspective.

Read the rest of this post HERE.