How to Navigate Editorial Feedback and Revise Your WIP – From the Writers in the Storm Blog

by Tiffany Yates Martin

The idea of finishing a manuscript is exhilarating—especially if you’re in the thrilling rush of momentum that is NaNoWriMo. (Hope it’s going great, NaNoers!) But as rewarding as it is to complete a draft, most writers know that isn’t the end of the road, just the first rest stop. Before you reach your destination—meaning agents, publishers, readers—you have to get out of the echo chamber of your own head and see what’s actually on the page. And for that, writers need objective feedback.

Yet once you get that feedback—whether you’re hiring a professional editor, sending the manuscript to your crit partners, or soliciting input from beta readers—what do you do with it?

It can be overwhelming to look at pages of editorial letter (often upward of 6-7K words, if you’re working with me), dozens or even hundreds of embedded comments, or an array of varying opinions among your critiquers and readers and process it all, let alone figure out what (and how) to translate that to your story.

Here are my step-by-step suggestions for how to navigate editorial feedback and most effectively approach revisions.

Read the rest of this post HERE.

Nurturing the Creative Spark Through Sleep from the Writers in the Storm Blog

by Ellen Buikema

Like many writers, I am fortunate to have a varied and interesting dreamlife. However, for almost a year after beginning our retirement travels I was unable to recall any dreams.

No dreams. No writing. Not good.

My dreamtime, normally filled with weird and thought-provoking scenarios, became a void. Sleep is playtime for the brain, and mine didn’t seem like it was having any fun.

If we don’t dream, we lose contact with reality.

Normally I’d remember enough of a dream for a short film, so not dreaming was a real concern. The most I’d recall upon waking was a fleeting feeling or snippet. In one, a kitten ran at me and jumped into my arms with such joy and force that it woke me up.

As I’d prefer not to be psychotic, I needed to know why the wonderful and sometimes frightening series of unconscious escapades escaped from memory.

Read the rest of this post HERE.

Start with Your Accordion Mostly Closed – From The Book Designer Blog

By Beth Barany

Elevator pitches–not just for marketing… Today, Beth Barany provides us with a different perspective on elevator pitches, those one paragraph synopses we should all be writing for our books, how to write them and how to use them. Lots of great information. I think you’ll enjoy it.


 
When I was starting on my path as a novelist, I just dove right in, but I had no idea what I was doing. It was scary but I was determined to stick with it, no matter what.

Soon I found roadmaps of sorts to guide me along my way. I didn’t know if these “how to” guides would get me to The End but I persisted.

Novel #1

My roadmap for my first novel was The Weekend Novelist by Robert J. Ray. Divided into 52 lessons, I was able to go through this book, complete the assignments, and make progress on my novel.

By the time I finished my first novel, I was determined to find a better way to write a novel. It took me 5 years to get to The End.

5 years, really? I mean, there had to be more direct routes to get to my destination of a finished first draft. (Though I know it took the time it took because learning, and life.)

Read the rest of this post HERE.

The process of writing a historical book – A post by Robbie Cheadle on Jennifer Alderson’s blog

Robbie Cheadle WWII historical fiction

I am happy to welcome author Robbie Cheadle back to my blog. She’s here to talk about her foray into historical fiction writing. Spoiler alert: it wasn’t as ‘easy’ as she’d expected! Take a moment to read about Robbie’s fascinating process of turning her mother’s earliest memories into a captivating memoir.

The process of writing a historical book

Robbie Cheadle

When I embarked on the journey of turning my mom’s early years into a book, I didn’t have a plan. She had told my siblings and me all sorts of tales about her early life while we were growing up and it seemed a simple thing to get her to jot down her memories and for me to turn them into a continuous story about her childhood. My mother grew up during WWII but that didn’t faze me at all. Even though I knew she was only seven years old when the war ended, it didn’t occur to me how much research would be required to get her story to hang together in a believable and factually accurate way.

We started off with her writing down her memories of various events during her life and I typed them up into a fictionalized account of her reality. Already, research was required. I had to learn an awful lot about everyday events during the period 1939 to 1945 such as what kind of swimming costumes were available during the war, what food could be grown and bought, how did the rationing of food work in practice, how did a dairy farmer sterilize the milk bottles and how was milk delivered. My mom could remember all sorts of oddments of information about her life and family, but this sort of detail was not available from her memories. Another issue I encountered early on during our writing process was the fact that my mom did not necessarily have her memories in order or in the correct timeframes.

Read the rest of this post HERE.

Publish Your Book In Multiple Versions – From the Book Marketing Buzz Blog

Can your book appear in 10 other forms? Yes, and then some. Here are some versions to consider:

  1. Limited Edition – only so many are printed and no re-prints are made.
  2. Deluxe Edition – the book is printed on special paper, the cover may have a special binding and feel, and it may come with something extra, like a DVD.
  3. Hardcore Trade Edition – hardcover book, typically 6 x 9.
  4. Trade Paperback – paperback book, typically 5.5 x 8.5.
  5. Mass Market Paperback – smaller paperback book, usually 4 x 6.
  6. Textbook Edition – enhance your book to look more like a textbook, with an index, list of resources, bibliography, study questions, etc.
  7. Comic Book – adapt your book into a comic book, replete with illustrations and minimal text.
  8. Book Digest – shortened version of your book, either with fewer chapters or shorter, condensed chapters.
  9. Premium – book is slightly changed to meet the needs of a specific company or organization that buys the book in bulk quantity.
  10. Series – create other books along the same theme as the first.
  11. Revised or Annual Edition – add a chapter or two, update your info, and boom, you have a new book.
  12. Audiobook.

Read the rest of this post HERE.

5 Ways To Stand Out As An Author On Social Media – From the Creative Penn Blog

5 Ways To Stand Out As An Author On Social Media

It can be overwhelming for authors to manage all that’s involved in marketing our books. In this article, Eevi Jones shares five easy ways to make the most of your social media branding so that those accounts are doing some of the work for you.

Promoting and marketing ourselves is quite a challenge for most of us authors.

And although it’s so very important, we often don’t have the time, or we simply don’t want to seem too pushy.

That’s why it’s all the more important to take advantage of all the opportunities that present themselves in our everyday lives, but are so often overlooked by most.

In this article, I will show you 5 simple changes you can make today, that can have such a huge impact for you and is such a quick and amazing win. Everyone here can do this within minutes. This is how so many of my clients have found me, my books, and my programs!

Read the rest of this post HERE.

Penny Sansevieri’s Top Book Marketing Complaints – From the Writers in the Storm Blog

Publishing a book is a big deal. But, as authors, you already know that it requires an investment not just in time, but in your money. From editing to book cover design and, of course, your marketing efforts, it’s important to you to maximize that investment. And it should be.

And, as with all things, there are good ways to invest in your book promotion and, the flip side, not-so-good ways.  Believe me, in nearly two decades in the book marketing business, I’ve heard it all, both from authors I work with and those I meet at industry events. And so, as a cautionary tale, I’m sharing the top complaints I hear from authors in the industry, and what you can do instead or to circumvent each problem altogether. 

Some of the ways we can avoid these issues may be fairly obvious to most people. For one, any agreements you sign should clearly state any deliverables. Similarly, if anyone makes any big promises like “bestseller status,” don’t walk, run away. No one can guarantee that. Outside of those big-ticket ideas, here are some of the biggest complaints in the book marketing industry.

Read the rest of this post HERE.