A Perfect 10 with Kathleen Jowitt

This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Author Kathleen Jowitt for this edition of A Perfect 10. Hurricane Irma stopped me from running this interview a week ago as scheduled.

Please enjoy this week’s installment of A Perfect 10

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. FlorySteve BoseleyKayla MattMae ClairJill SammutDeanna KahlerDawn Reno LangleyJohn HowellElaine CouglerJan SikesNancy BellNick DavisKathleen LopezSusan ThatcherCharles YallowitzArmand RosamiliaTracey PaganaAnna DobrittKaren OberlaenderDeby FredericksTeri PolenDarlene FosterRobert Rayner, C.C. NaughtonSherry RentshlerLinda BradleyLuna St. ClairJoan HallStaci TroiloAllan HudsonRobert EggletonPaul Scott BatesP.C. ZickJoy LennickPatrick Roland, Mary Carlomagno

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


KJpicDoes writing energize or exhaust you?

At the beginning, it energizes me. Words generate words; I wake up in the night and know exactly what needs to happen next. I’m riding on the top of an exhilarating wave. After a while, the momentum dies away and it becomes more of a slog.

Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

I’ve thought about it, if only for the reason that my middle names would work very well as one! (Adele Fox – it has a certain ring to it, doesn’t it?) But then my own name is very distinctive and I like the idea of keeping all my original work under the same umbrella.

Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

A certain amount of confidence is vital, particularly if one’s going to self-publish. One has to be willing to take responsibility for one’s own work, to say, yes, this is good enough to put out into the world, and there’s no room for false modesty in that. But the other side of that coin is that one also has to look at that same work with a very clear eye, to accept the idea that it might have faults and to do whatever is possible to correct those faults.

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Membership of the Society of Authors. I don’t think I’d have come across the Betty Trask Prize without being on the mailing list, and that’s really changed everything. Being the first self-published author ever to win a Betty Trask Award gives me a credibility that I’d have had to struggle for otherwise. And they’ve been so supportive ever since.

What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

Producing good quality work, and having others, whose judgement I trust, recognize it. And yes, I’ve been fortunate enough for that to happen. The judges for the Betty Trask Prize were Joanne Harris, Michèle Roberts, and Simon Brett. I spent several weeks in a sort of daze, murmuring, ‘Joanne Harris read my book. Joanne Harris… likes my book!’ Not to mention approval from friends whose taste I share. But really, if I’m not satisfied with the quality of my work, it doesn’t mean anything.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

It depends on the subject matter. Usually it involves a lot of reading around the topic, finding personal accounts by people who have been in comparable situations. I always start out with good intentions about having in-depth knowledge of the subject before I start writing, but very often I find that the research itself prompts scenes or lines to come to my head, so I’m quite likely to be researching and writing at the same time.

How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

Usually I pick names that appeal to me in some way and write the character to suit. I did once have to rename a character because I’d inadvertently chosen the exact same name as a senior member of staff in a future employer.

What is the hardest type of scene to write?

For me, anything descriptive. Dialogue flows naturally, but I have to go back through and put in all the action afterwards. My first drafts all consist of indeterminate colourless blobs engaging in conversations of sparkling wit.

If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

Whoever it was, I’d worry about making a fool of myself! I think I’d get some of the great opera singers together, the ones who died before the age of recording, and ask them to sing. I’d love to know what they really sounded like. Let’s say… Jenny Lind, Maria Malibran, and Farinelli. And I think Julie d’Aubigny would be an interesting dinner guest. Quite apart from being an opera singer, she eloped with a girl from a convent, set the convent on fire, and fought several duels. It might not be the world’s most successful dinner party, but it would definitely be memorable!

What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

Probably Twitter, if only because it’s brought me into contact with authors and bloggers I wouldn’t have met otherwise.

About Kathleen’s Book:

coverEBOOKA new year at the University of Stancester, and Lydia Hawkins is trying to balance the demands of her studies with her responsibilities as an officer for the Christian Fellowship. Her mission: to make sure all the Christians in her hall stay on the straight and narrow, and to convert the remaining residents if possible. To pass her second year. And to ensure a certain secret stays very secret indeed.

When she encounters the eccentric, ecumenical student household at 27 Alma Road, Lydia is forced to expand her assumptions about who’s a Christian to include radical Quaker activist Becky, bells-and-smells bus-spotter Peter, and out (bisexual) and proud (Methodist) Colette. As the year unfolds, Lydia discovers that there are more ways to be Christian – and more ways to be herself – than she had ever imagined.

Then a disgruntled member of the Catholic Society starts asking whether the Christian Fellowship is really as Christian as it claims to be, and Lydia finds herself at the centre of a row that will reach far beyond the campus. Speak Its Name explores what happens when faith, love and politics mix and explode.

More information on the book is available at www.kathleenjowitt.com/speak-its-name

The Amazon links are here (US) http://www.amazon.com/Speak-Its-Name-Kathleen-Jowitt/dp/0993533906 and here (UK) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Speak-its-Name-Kathleen-Jowitt/dp/0993533906/ – there are various other links on Kathleen’s web page.

Connect with Kathleen:

Website: www.kathleenjowitt.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/KathleenJowitt

 

Come and be interviewed

interview-3Hello,

I’ve been running my weekly ‘Perfect 10’ interview series this year. Every Monday, I run an interview with an author and ask them a series of 10 thought-provoking questions. As I look toward the end of the year, I still have about 10 slots open.

If you’re releasing a book for the holidays or trying to get more exposure and meet other authors and bloggers, this is a great opportunity. Just email me at don@donmassenzio.com and I’ll send you the necessary instructions.

This is a great opportunity and there are only 10 slots left until the end of the year.

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. FlorySteve BoseleyKayla MattMae ClairJill SammutDeanna KahlerDawn Reno LangleyJohn HowellElaine CouglerJan SikesNancy BellNick DavisKathleen LopezSusan ThatcherCharles YallowitzArmand RosamiliaTracey PaganaAnna DobrittKaren OberlaenderDeby FredericksTeri PolenDarlene FosterRobert Rayner, C.C. NaughtonSherry RentshlerLinda BradleyLuna St. ClairJoan HallStaci TroiloAllan HudsonRobert EggletonPaul Scott BatesP.C. ZickJoy LennickPatrick Roland

A Perfect 10 with Mary Carlomagno

This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Author Mary Carlomagno for this edition of A Perfect 10.

Please enjoy this week’s installment of A Perfect 10

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. FlorySteve BoseleyKayla MattMae ClairJill SammutDeanna KahlerDawn Reno LangleyJohn HowellElaine CouglerJan SikesNancy BellNick DavisKathleen LopezSusan ThatcherCharles YallowitzArmand RosamiliaTracey PaganaAnna DobrittKaren OberlaenderDeby FredericksTeri PolenDarlene FosterRobert Rayner, C.C. NaughtonSherry RentshlerLinda BradleyLuna St. ClairJoan HallStaci TroiloAllan HudsonRobert EggletonPaul Scott BatesP.C. ZickJoy Lennick, Patrick Roland

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


Resized_20170620_172203

Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Both, I am exhausted while doing it and energized when finished.  A famous writer once said, it feels better to have written, than actually to write.

Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

I have never considered a pseudonym, but it’s not a bad idea, given my last name!

Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?  

I think it can help, because you have to have something that will drive you forward.  Writing is not fun.  Writing a novel is pure torture.

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

My MAC!

What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

I am getting closer.  I began my career as a non-fiction writer, writing what I knew which included how to store shoes and tidy up people’s spice racks.  I was a professional organizer for 12 years and I often wrote on assignment.  My first three books are about organizing and living with less.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

I use my life as source material, but often look at pop culture and for that the Internet is invaluable.  It’s amazing how much you can learn by sitting at your desk.

How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?  

Sometimes I get inspired by people I know.  If I meet an awesome person, I usually want to honor them in a book.  And other times, it is just a random vibe or feeling.

What is the hardest type of scene to write?

Romantic scenes are difficult to get just right.

If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

1dPrince – I would probably not be brave enough to ask him anything. But I would like to hear him speak about anything, He fascinates me!

2dF. Scott Fitzgerald –  I really want to know for sure if Gatsby is based on real people!

3dJane Austen – I think it would be amazing to hear her speak about mannerly England.

PocahontasPocahontas – I would ask her all about what her life, especially her love life!

What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

I think social media has been the most measurable way to sell books.  The interaction with readers is immediate and very satisfying.

About Mary

I am the author of three previous books about organizing, a nationally recognized spokesperson and owner of order (orderperiod.com) a company that helps busy people get organized and live more balanced lives. I have been featured on the Oprah Winfrey Show, NBC’s Today, and National Public Radio. I was born and raised in New Jersey, a state that I love so much that I have never been away for more than two weeks at a time.

About Mary’s Book

BFFH Cover_v4.2 7.38.40 AM

Jersey Girl Jessie DeSalvo has her dream job at one of New York’s top publishing companies. After ten years of hard work the day of her big promotion has arrived. Unfortunately, her company has other ideas. Instead of a corner office, Jessie is handed her pink slip.

Left with little more than her cell phone and an unusable contact list, Jessie retreats to less-than-fashionable Hoboken, New Jersey, to figure out her life—and deal with the attentions of her loving but inquisitive Italian-American family. Then she accidentally stumbles into a career as a professional best friend—by helping friends and strangers straighten out whatever is wrong with their lives. Her jobs include planning the New Jersey wedding of the year and saving a bankrupt rock club in town. Soon, things get complicated when she falls in love with the club manager—and promises an appearance by Bruce Springsteen.

In the end, Jessie realizes that not even “The Boss” can make things right—and that she needs to become her own best friend to be truly happy.

ORDER BEST FRIEND FOR HIRE NOW!

htcartps://www.amazon.com/Best-Friend-Hire-Mary-Carlomagno/dp/1682612600/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1494438499&sr=8-1&keywords=best+friend+for+hire

Connect with Mary

Mary@orderperiod.com

https://www.facebook.com/MaryCarlomagnoauthor/

https://www.facebook.com/BestFriend4Hire/

marycarlomagno.com

Orderperiod.com

 

A Perfect 10 with Patrick Roland

This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Author Patrick Roland for this edition of A Perfect 10.

Please enjoy this week’s installment of A Perfect 10

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. FlorySteve BoseleyKayla MattMae ClairJill SammutDeanna KahlerDawn Reno LangleyJohn HowellElaine CouglerJan SikesNancy BellNick DavisKathleen LopezSusan ThatcherCharles YallowitzArmand RosamiliaTracey PaganaAnna DobrittKaren OberlaenderDeby FredericksTeri PolenDarlene FosterRobert Rayner, C.C. NaughtonSherry RentshlerLinda BradleyLuna St. ClairJoan HallStaci TroiloAllan HudsonRobert EggletonPaul Scott BatesP.C. Zick, Joy Lennick

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


Author PhotoDoes writing energize or exhaust you?

I think it’s a little of both. I think the idea of it sometimes is exhausting, but then once you’ve done it and you have a finished product – something you are really proud of – that’s very energizing. That’s been my experience lately.

Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

I don’t and considering what I admit to doing in my book – I go there! – I don’t think I ever would. To me, it takes away the authenticity of what I am trying to do by telling my story. My hope in doing this is really to help the next person who is going through something similar, but if I am not honest about who I am, why would they even connect to me? This whole exercise is about human connection. This is me stripping the walls of fear and shame I built around myself and saying “this is who I am. I got through this and you can too.”

Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

I think ultimately it hurts. I don’t know why anyone would be interested in reading something by someone who wasn’t humble. That doesn’t seem attainable to me. The thing about me is that I’m a very regular guy. Maybe I’ve gotten through some extraordinary circumstances, but there’s nothing about me that makes me any better or any more than anyone else. That’s why I wanted to do this – I wanted people to know it’s possible to move through pain into power. Because it really is. But it would be useless to me if I didn’t try to help the next person.

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

I haven’t even made any money yet but when I do, I’ll let you know. 😉

What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

Well there are a number of different ways you could define “success,” and I suppose the most would do so based on popularity or riches, but regardless of whether or not I ever become the next literary sensation, I do feel like a success because I realized a dream. I did something pretty amazing I always wanted to do that was very supported by my community and the people in my life. Even more, this whole process changed me as a person. I’m not even the same guy I was before I wrote this book. I was able to take all this awful stuff that once broke me, find acceptance in all of it and turn it in to this artistic work that is pretty beautiful. So, that does feel like a success.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

Well this particular book was my life. So I guess I spent about 40 years researching it. Every single thing happened. It’s all true. All the pain. All the heartache. All the eventual growth. All the eventual sparkle. The experience, strength and hope is all real.

How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

With the exception of one chapter, “Wrecking Ball,” all of the names of the people in my book are real. I changed that one because my publisher felt one of the other drug addicts was portrayed negatively so we didn’t want to harm anyone. I also never used my partner’s real name because he wasn’t out so there is no way to identify him. Nor did I identify anyone in his family. I didn’t want to give them any reason to come after me further.

What is the hardest type of scene to write?

The stuff with my mother was the hardest. We had a very toxic relationship during the time period of this particular narrative. Still, she is my mother so I didn’t want to destroy her. She was way worse in earlier drafts of the book and I still went in pretty hard. I had to be honest about our relationship though because this is the person that I had the most conflict with during this time that ultimately does the thing that saves me from myself so there had to be some juxtaposition there. Because we did not get along then.

If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

1-dinnerWell, my first choice is obviously going to be Pack (my deceased partner) because I would pick him over and over again every time. I don’t even know what if ask him because I imagine I’d be really overwhelmed to see him again.

2-dinnerThen I pick my best friend Megan because they never got to meet and that makes me really sad.

3-dinnerMy next selection is Whitney Houston because she has always been my favorite singer and I was supposed to meet her once but she was, um, “busy.” (You can draw your own conclusions on what she was doing there).

4-dinner

Then I would pick Oprah because she could make me a literary superstar, right? Maybe we’d all get a car!

What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

Me. This book is very personal and I’ve had the most success when I directly interact with people who are interested in it. Unfortunately, that isn’t always possible, so I answer questions like these! I hope your readers have gotten a taste of what my sparkle is like and I hope they know how much they sparkle, too!

Find Patrick’s Book:

Cover Design Other formatWebsite: http://unpackedsparkle.com/

Amazon USA: https://www.amazon.com/Unpacked-Sparkle-Story-Grief-Recovery/dp/1944826319

Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Unpacked-Sparkle-Story-Grief-Recovery-ebook/dp/B01M5IVU5G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1496607233&sr=8-1&keywords=Unpacked+Sparkle

Connect with Patrick:

Twitter: @Unpackedsparkle

Facebook (both the below)

https://m.facebook.com/LLPBONE?ref=bookmarks

https://m.facebook.com/unpackedsparkle/?ref=bookmarks

 

A Perfect 10 with Joy Lennick

This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Author Joy Lennick for this edition of A Perfect 10.

Please enjoy this week’s installment of A Perfect 10

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. FlorySteve BoseleyKayla MattMae ClairJill SammutDeanna KahlerDawn Reno LangleyJohn HowellElaine CouglerJan SikesNancy BellNick DavisKathleen LopezSusan ThatcherCharles YallowitzArmand RosamiliaTracey PaganaAnna DobrittKaren OberlaenderDeby FredericksTeri PolenDarlene FosterRobert Rayner, C.C. NaughtonSherry RentshlerLinda BradleyLuna St. ClairJoan HallStaci TroiloAllan HudsonRobert EggletonPaul Scott Bates, P.C. Zick

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


Damon 025

Does writing energize or exhaust you?

It does both at times! I experience pockets of pure excitement, happiness and a certain, tenuous, fulfillment; but also of frustration and despair!

Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

I tried using a male pseudonym with some short stories as a test. Noticed no difference.

Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

I think it does and only wish mine was more pronounced. I’m an extrovert/introvert….

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

On travelling, because it really does broaden the mind and offers so much for our minds to digest and play with.

What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

My first two books (factual) sold really well; reaching so many people was a novelty for a novice, and the financial reward was a pleasant surprise, BUT I would love to write a worthy novel, so a yes/no reply…

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

I do whatever research is required. When in the UK (I now live in Spain) I’d haunt the library. Now  I ask questions, read books and check out Google. I tend to plan more in my head and make notes before I start a book.

How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

Names seem to present themselves.  So far, I’ve not had a problem.

What is the hardest type of scene to write?

I’m not keen on gratuitous violence or sex – believing that less is more…and find sex scenes a little tricky as I don’t want to dilute the passion. I’ve labored over a few scenes but felt satisfied at the outcome.

If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

What a hard question! There are a multitude I’d love to dine with! It would have to be Charlotte Bronte, Shakespeare, Charles Dickens and John Steinbeck. I’d ask them if they ever thought they’d be famous and if they had second thoughts about continuing writing.(Steinbeck especially was rejected so much!)

What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

In the 1980’s, I couldn’t have asked more of the mainstream publisher Kogan Page Ltd., of London. They had long tentacles… Now, one has to be a wizard or rich re self-promotion and technical know-how. I use Twitter, Facebook, WordPress and LinkedIn, but it”s a slow slog.

Find Joy’s Books:

Angelsanddevils_final

WHERE ANGELS & DEVILS TREAD

My Gentle War Front Cover - Copy

MY GENTLE WAR

 

A Perfect 10 with P.C. Zick

This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Author P.C. Zick for this edition of A Perfect 10.

Please enjoy this week’s installment of A Perfect 10

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. FlorySteve BoseleyKayla MattMae ClairJill SammutDeanna KahlerDawn Reno LangleyJohn HowellElaine CouglerJan SikesNancy BellNick DavisKathleen LopezSusan ThatcherCharles YallowitzArmand RosamiliaTracey PaganaAnna DobrittKaren OberlaenderDeby FredericksTeri PolenDarlene FosterRobert Rayner, C.C. NaughtonSherry RentshlerLinda BradleyLuna St. ClairJoan HallStaci TroiloAllan HudsonRobert Eggleton, Paul Scott Bates

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


AuthorPhotoNew

Does writing energize or exhaust you?

It can do both. After a good day of writing, I feel energized. That’s a day where the writing comes easily, and I write a complete scene or at least know where I’m going the next day. When it doesn’t come as easily, and I’m pushing myself because of a deadline, I can feel exhausted at the end of the day. That doesn’t happen very often. Mostly, I’m revived by writing.

Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

I use my initials before my last name instead of my full name of Patricia Camburn Zick. So, I suppose P.C. Zick could be considered a pseudonym. I have thought of using something completely different if I ever wrote in a genre at odds with what readers expect from me. But I’m not giving up any secrets today!

Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

A big ego can get in the way of becoming a great author. A big ego is easily deflated or tends to ignore advice. As an author, I view myself as a life-long learner, and I keep an open mind to discover new ways to tell stories. A writer must also listen to an editor and be able to take constructive criticism to improve the work. A huge ego can get in the way of that process. Authors must be humble to handle reviews as well. I read my reviews—good and bad—and attempt to learn from them, if it’s constructive. If not, I ignore it. A huge ego will only interfere or be so deflated that the writing ends.

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

This question is difficult to answer. I know I’ve wasted a ton of money on advertising that didn’t work and pie-in-the-sky claims of workshops that will change my writing career forever. Spending money on good computers makes life easier. And there are some books that have been great investments because I refer to them with every book I write. Here are three I use all the time: Self-Editing for Fiction Writers, On Writing Romance, and Structuring Your Novel.

What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

My view on writing success has changed over the two decades I’ve been writing fiction. At first, I thought it meant a call from Oprah. Then I realized how many other authors wished and hoped for the same thing and how many got that call. And would that really define my success? I view it differently now. I feel successful if I finish reading one of my novels and find myself in tears at the end. I know I’m successful when I hear from a reader that one of my books touched her or him. Sales are always nice, but are dependent on other things besides writing. I do feel I’ve achieved success as a writer, and it’s more inward than outward. Others may not be able to see it, but I know I have achieved a level of success that sustains me and inspires me enough to keep at it.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

I draft and research as I go since I’m a “pantser” type of writer. Often, I come up with a new direction while writing the first draft and that sends me to research. I have a large library of books I use, but I am very dependent on the Internet. Things have changed in that way. When I first began, I would compile lists of things to research and then spend days at the library seeking sources. I’m careful on Internet sources and make sure they are respected sites—universities or articles in reliable media.

How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

I brainstorm for characters and sometimes change them several times while writing a novel. A name has to fit the personality I’ve created, so I go more instinctually. I don’t think I’ve ever regretted using any names. I try not to repeat names, especially of main characters. That becomes more difficult the more novels I write.

What is the hardest type of scene to write?

I find the conclusion or resolution the hardest to write in a novel. That seems silly because it should be the easiest. But endings are the hardest because I never want to sound trite or sound as if I’m in a hurry to finish the novel. I’ve sent off drafts to beta readers without the final chapter or epilogue and asked for suggestions.

If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

I’m going literary!

1-bkBarbara Kingsolver – I would ask her about her next project. She writes passionate tales about conservation issues, and I so admire the knowledge that goes into her fiction. I learn a tremendous amount from each of her books. I would want to know where her focus will go next.

1-chCarl Hiaasen – I know where Carl gets his material—he lives in South Florida. I’ve heard him speak several times, and his tales are hilarious. I would like him to discuss how he manages to walk the line with his humor, satire, and sarcasm while still making a point about Florida and what has been done to its natural beauty.

1-js

John Steinbeck – If I was in a room with John Steinbeck, I would probably be too tongue-tied to ask anything. But if I could, I would ask him if his metaphors from the natural world were easily constructed or did he agonize over finding the perfect analogy for the story he was conveying. His symbolism and metaphorical use of language inspired me to begin writing.

1-hl

Harper Lee – She fascinates me because she wrote one of the most classic pieces of literature to hit the twentieth century. Then the book published posthumously seemed to tear apart the iconic figure she created in To Kill a Mockingbird. I would ask her if she really wrote Go Set a Watchman, and if she did, why did she change so much in her interpretation of Atticus Finch from one novel to the next. I love both books, but I’m very curious that these were the only two major pieces of literature she created in her lifetime.

What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

Putting my books in Amazon Select and taking advantage of promo free days has brought me the greatest success. I’ve never been accepted into BookBub, so I don’t know what that success looks like, but I know other authors have done very well with that experience. I buy advertising slots and do guest blogs when I’m doing a promo. And when it’s for a book in a series, I try to have the other books on special sale as well, but not free.

About P.C.’s Books:

FacebookCoverNewBehind the Love Contemporary Romance Series

Behind the Altar, Behind the Bar, and Behind the Curtain, Behind the Door

Behind the Altar, Book One – A TATTOO ARTIST ON A HARLEY. A DO-GOODER BEAUTY. A FORBIDDEN PASSION. Leah Bryant lives a quiet life helping others. When her future mother-in-law, Geraldine, threatens her causes, she’s left confused by the hypocrisy and befuddled by a stranger who roars into town on a Harley.

Behind the Bar, Book Two – HE WANTS A BREAK. SHE WANTS A RING. LOVE STANDS ON SHAKY GROUND. Susie Williams yearns for a romantic wedding with her boyfriend of five years. Reggie Barker runs from demands to marry any woman, including Susie.

Behind the Curtain, Book Three – SHE WANTS TO BE A STAR. HE WANTS HER. ONLY A QUEST FOR STARDOM STANDS IN THE WAY. Lisa Williams has discovered a way to achieve her life-long goal of becoming a famous actress by bringing a reality television show to her hometown. Tommy Jackson despises the idea of exploiting the town and hates it even more when his editor assigns him to cover the show for a Tampa newspaper.

Behind the Curtain, Book Four – A VOLUPTUOUS WOMAN UNLUCKY IN LOVE. A WOUNDED PSYCHOLOGIST ON A MISSION. AN UNDENIABLE ATTRACTION WITH AN ETHICAL DILEMMA. Sally Jean Compton is in love. And this time it’s with a man who isn’t in love with someone else.

Connect with P.C. Zick:

Behind the Love series – https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06ZY5WSYH

Amazon Central: http://www.amazon.com/P.C.-Zick/e/B0083DPN4E/

Website: www.pczick.com/

Blog: www.pczick.wordpress.com

Facebook: https://facebook/PCZick

Twitter: https://twitter/PCZick

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5989135.P_C_Zick

Google +: https://plus.google.com/u/0/114232083554517874771/posts

Editing Blog – The Manuscript Doctor:  https://pczickeditor.wordpress.com/

About P.C. Zick:

Bestselling author P.C. Zick describes herself as a storyteller no matter what she writes. And she writes in a variety of genres, including romance, contemporary fiction, and nonfiction. She’s won various awards for her essays, columns, editorials, articles, and fiction.

The three novels in her Florida Fiction Series contain stories of Florida and its people and environment, which she credits as giving her a rich base for her storytelling. “Florida’s quirky and abundant wildlife—both human and animal—supply my fiction with tales almost too weird to be believable.”

Her contemporary romances in the Behind the Love series are also set in Florida. The novels in her most recent series, Smoky Mountain Romances, are set in in Murphy, North Carolina. She is currently working on a new romance series, Rivals in Love. Join the Crandall family of Chicago as the siblings find love despite their focus on successful careers. All of her books are stand-alone reads, even if they appear in a series.

Her novels contain elements of romance with strong female characters, handsome heroes, and descriptive settings. She believes in living lightly upon this earth with love, laughter, and passion, and through her fiction, she imparts this philosophy in an entertaining manner with an obvious love for her characters, plot, and themes.

You can keep track of P.C. Zick’s new releases and special promotions by signing up for her newsletter by clicking here. For more immediate information, sign up for P.C. Zick’s Lovers of Romantic Tales on Facebook by clicking here.

 

A Perfect 10 with Paul Scott Bates

This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Author Paul Scott Bates on this edition of A Perfect 10.

Please enjoy this week’s installment of A Perfect 10

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. FlorySteve BoseleyKayla MattMae ClairJill SammutDeanna KahlerDawn Reno LangleyJohn HowellElaine CouglerJan SikesNancy BellNick DavisKathleen LopezSusan ThatcherCharles YallowitzArmand RosamiliaTracey PaganaAnna DobrittKaren OberlaenderDeby FredericksTeri PolenDarlene FosterRobert Rayner, C.C. NaughtonSherry RentshlerLinda BradleyLuna St. ClairJoan HallStaci TroiloAllan Hudson, Robert Eggleton.

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


Bio PicDoes writing energize or exhaust you? 

At the time of writing it often energizes, particularly if I’m pleased with the result.  I wrote one poem, Lament that when I’d finished it I actually couldn’t remember writing it.  It just flowed for maybe an hour and came straight out, few interruptions, it just seems to appear before me.  I’m very proud of that piece.  I find writing very cathartic, it can act as a vehicle for my emotions and, as essentially a very socially inadequate person, it helps me express myself without being out on a pedestal.

 Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not? 

I haven’t yet.  I’m not sure why I would want to.  Its difficult getting your name out there so to start again seems counter-productive.  Some writers write under a different name to distance their work from something else they have written – I’m thinking about J.K. Rowling here – and that’s their prerogative and fine but at the moment I’m not sure it would work for me.  That said, I am working on another project which involves my poetry that I’m keeping quite separate at the moment.

Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not? 

That’s a difficult question.  A big ego can help a writer to promote their work but it could possibly lead to self-destruction.  I think with any profession it’s easy to become complacent.   A new writer with a big ego would struggle as I don’t think the public would connect with them.  I think it’s important to appear real and approachable particularly with poetry as it seems to be a very misunderstood genre.

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer? 

As a new writer, the best money I have spent is buying my initial batch of books to sell!

What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

In many ways, having a book published was success in itself.  I started writing over thirty years ago in my teens and dreamed of having a ‘real’ book.  Whist e-books seem like the current fad, I’m still very keen on holding a paper bound book in my hands.  I’d love greater success of course, selling more copies of the book and getting recognition but that’s probably more cognitive than a requirement.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use? 

I just study life, feelings and expressions.  Some of my poetry is fictional, some of it not, the goal for me is to leave the writer wondering which is which – then I have succeeded.  Poems can be influenced by life events, TV programmes, even a line in a song, anything that affects me in a strong way can potentially find itself in a poem.

How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why? 

Many of the names I have used have been fictional and just names I liked the sound of – Andrewina, Josephine for instance.  I wrote a trio of poems about a character called Sarah-Jane, a partner who had passed away and I struggled to let go even after death, at the time it was fictional but I now know a few SJ’s and I have to tell them they aren’t the influence!

What is the hardest type of scene to write? 

I tend not to write something that I find difficult.  I don’t force myself to write, only writing about things that I know will come to me.

If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them? 

1-dinnerOh goodness, that’s really difficult.  I’ll probably name four and then think of another fifty afterwards!  I’d love Yoko Ono to be there, she’s amazing woman and so forward thinking, sure we’d have lots in common and could talk for hours.  I think she’s very misunderstood as a person in her own right.

A comedian like Spike Milligan or Tommy Cooper – I suspect that they were quite dark personalities so very different from their stage personas although I’m sure they would keep me amused as their senses of humour matched my own.

3-dinnerI’d like my Grandads to be there too.  I never knew one of them and the other died when I was 9 so never really had a relationship with either.

For people that are still living maybe an actor like Anthony Hopkins, or Stephen Fry they could tell some fascinating stories I’m sure, and maybe my wife as she’s my rock and means so much to me, she would contribute a lot to the whole situation.  I wouldn’t want to have such an enthralling dinner without her being there.

What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books? 

I’m still new to the world of books so at the moment it has been family, Twitter and Facebook. I’d love ‘word of mouth’ to spread and people to buy the book on recommendation and maybe via good reviews.  I have a friend who has also been leaving a few copies of my book on the London Underground for people to pick up!  Anything is worth a try!

Scott’s Book:

My current book, Hitting the Black Wall is available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

HITTING THE BLACK WALL DRAFT1 USE THIS ONE 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=hitting+the+black+wall+paul+scott-bates&sprefix=hitting+the+black+wall+paul+scott%2Caps%2C896&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Ahitting+the+black+wall+paul+scott-bates

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/hitting-theblack-wall-paul-scott-bates/1123941647?ean=9781534701670

Connect with Scott:

https://twitter.com/hiapoetry

https://www.facebook.com/hiapoetry?_rdr=p

http://hiapoetry.blogspot.co.uk/