A Perfect 10 With Darlene Foster

A Perfect 10 With Darlene Foster

Today, I’m very excited to feature Darlene Foster as she sits down for this weeks edition of a Perfect 10. Please enjoy.

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. Flory, Steve Boseley, Kayla Matt, Mae Clair, Jill Sammut, Deanna Kahler, Dawn Reno Langley, John Howell, Elaine Cougler, Jan Sikes, Nancy Bell, Nick Davis, Kathleen Lopez, Susan Thatcher, Charles Yallowitz, Armand Rosamilia, Tracey Pagana, Anna Dobritt, Karen Oberlaender, Deby Fredericks, Teri Polen

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


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  • Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Writing energizes me. I believe tapping into your creative side is so good for you. I wrote my first four books while working full time. I would come home from work exhausted, make dinner and then sit down to write. It was amazing how quickly I perked up and wrote well into the evening.

  • Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

When I was twelve I wrote under the pseudonym of Shirley Dale which I thought was so cool at the time. Not sure if that counts. As an adult writer I never considered it. I want people to know who I am and to be able to find me. Now if I started to write erotica, I may rethink it!

  • Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

A big ego could be an asset while promoting yourself. It didn´t seem to hurt Ernest Hemmingway.

  • What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

The best money I ever spent as a writer was taking trips to interesting places, which later became settings for my novels. It helps to have been there.

  • What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

Writing success for me is having people read my books and enjoy them. I feel I have achieved that. Now I would like more people to read my books. Success is a moving target.

  • What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

I use the Internet for my research and sometimes the library. I tend to do my research as I write. I also do some research while I am travelling, keep notes and take pictures to help me remember things.

  • How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

I have always been happy with the names of my characters. In many cases they chose the names themselves.

  • What is the hardest type of scene to write?

I find it hard to write scary scenes. I don´t read a lot of scary novels or watch scary movies, perhaps I should. I am never sure if the scene is scary enough or maybe too scary for kids.

  • If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

I love this question. I would chose Jane Austen, William Shakespeare, Margaret Atwood and Lucy Maude Montgomery. I would have so many questions. One I would ask is how they came up with the amazing characters in their stories. I would have a separate list for each of them. It would be a long dinner.

  • What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

I think blogging has brought me the most marketing success. It is such a great way to build relationships with readers and other writers.

Darlene’s Book:

9781771681025smallAmanda on the Danube – The Sounds of Music, the fifth book in the Amanda Travels series.

Book Blurb:

Twelve-year-old Amanda Ross finds herself on an elegant riverboat with her bestie, Leah, cruising down the beautiful Danube, passing medieval castles, luscious green valleys and charming villages. When she is entrusted with a valuable violin by a young, homeless musician during a stop in Germany, a mean boy immediately attempts to take it from her.

Back on their cruise, Amanda struggles to keep the precious violin safe for the poor prodigy. Along the way, she encounters a mysterious monk, a Santa Claus look-alike, and the same nasty boy.

Follow Amanda down the Danube, through Germany, Austria and Hungary, as she enjoys the enchanting sounds of music everywhere she goes. She remains on the lookout though, wondering just who she can trust.

Buy links

Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Amanda-Danube-Sounds-Music-Travels-ebook/dp/B01J4KULPU/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1467057798&sr=1-1

 Kobo https://www.kobo.com/ca/en/ebook/amanda-on-the-danube

 Barnes & Noble http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/amanda-on-the-danube-darlene-foster/1123486689?ean=9781771681025

 Book Deposiotry http://www.bookdepository.com/Amand-on-the-Danube-Darlene-Foster/9781771681025

 Connect with Darlene:

Website www.darlenefoster.ca

 Blog https://darlenefoster.wordpress.com/

 Facebook https://www.facebook.com/DarleneFosterWriter/

 Twitter https://twitter.com/supermegawoman

A Perfect 10 with Teri Polen

A Perfect 10 with Teri Polen

Today we sit down with author and blogger Teri Polen. She is going to tell us a bit about her work and inspiration.

Please enjoy her responses to these 10 questions and check out her work in this edition of A Perfect 10.

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. Flory, Steve Boseley, Kayla Matt, Mae Clair, Jill Sammut, Deanna Kahler, Dawn Reno Langley, John Howell, Elaine Cougler, Jan Sikes, Nancy Bell, Nick Davis, Kathleen Lopez, Susan Thatcher, Charles Yallowitz, Armand Rosamilia, Tracey Pagana, Anna Dobritt, Karen Oberlaender, Deby Fredericks

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


author photo

 

  • Does writing energize or exhaust you?

It depends on the day.  Sometimes the words come faster than I can get them down – others, I’m slamming my head against a wall hoping something useful falls out.

  • Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

With only one book to my name so far, I’ve never used a pseudonym, but I’d definitely consider it.  I know some authors with strong fan bases in a certain genre have used pseudonyms when branching into other areas.

  • Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

You can look at that a couple of different ways.  If a big ego references someone who thinks they’ve written a Pulitzer Prize-worthy book after only one draft, yeah – you’re hurting yourself and need a serious reality check.  But you can also look at ego in the sense that you have strong self-confidence and self-esteem, which you most certainly need in this business – along with a thick skin – and be accepting and welcoming of constructive criticism.

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  • What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

For the past couple of years, I’ve attended a writer’s retreat hosted by author C.J. Redwine.  I’ve become friends with many of the other writers and we support each other when there are doubts, questions, need for second opinions, etc.  C.J. also offers workshops and critiques during the retreat – and the food is outstanding!  I’m going again in September.

  • What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

Writing success to me means creating something I’m proud of, hearing that people have enjoyed reading my book, and constantly striving to improve my craft.  I’ve achieved the first two – always working on the third one.

  • What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

I haven’t had to do an extensive amount of research – which is a good thing, because I really don’t have the patience for it.  Luckily, I’ve never felt the urge to write historical fiction.  Any research I’ve done has been online and involved actual places – restaurants, movie theaters, shops – to include in my book.  I think it adds authenticity to the story.  With the current book I’m working on, I’ve looked into quantum physics.  Strange, but true.

  • How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

Some characters just tell me their names – which helps out a lot.  Sometimes I’ll come across a name I like and file it away for future use.  When I’ve been stumped for a character name, I’ve looked up baby name lists from the year the character would have been born.  So far, I haven’t regretted any names I’ve chosen.

  • What is the hardest type of scene to write?

For me, it’s any kind of love scene.  The types of books I write don’t include many love scenes – there’s not a lot of bodice ripping with YA, but there’s usually at least a touch of a romantic subplot in the mix.  Romance isn’t a genre I read or watch, so I’m not as comfortable writing it.  On the other hand, writing about zombie killing, ways to hide bodies, or summoning spirits?  No problem whatsoever.

  • If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

I had to think about this one for a while, but I narrowed it down to J.K. Rowling, Stephen King, Victoria Schwab, and Jeremy Renner.  I’d literally spend hours discussing world-building and craft with the writers – dinner wouldn’t be nearly enough time.  With Jeremy Renner, I’m a huge fan of his work and a total Marvel fangirl – maybe he could get me tickets to the next Comic-Con.

  • What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

I’d have to say my blog.  I began laying the groundwork for a platform a few years back, hoping to build a network of book lovers and authors.  Through blogging, I’ve met so many wonderful writers and bloggers who support each other and help spread the word with new releases, promotions, reviews, etc., and many of them have become friends.

About Teri’s book:

Sarah+eimageSeventeen-year-old horror fan Cain Shannon thought helping a ghost find her killers would be the supernatural adventure of a lifetime.  Now, he just hopes to survive long enough to protect his family and friends from her.

A bet between friends goes horribly wrong, resulting in Sarah’s death.  When she returns to seek justice against those responsible, Cain agrees to help her.  But when he discovers Sarah has been hijacking his body, he realizes she wants retribution instead of justice.

Terrified of what could have happened when he wasn’t in control, Cain commands Sarah to leave his house – but exorcising her isn’t that easy.  She retaliates against her murderers in bloody, horrific ways, each death making her stronger, then sets her sights on Cain.  With the help of friends, Cain fights to save himself and his loved ones and searches for a way to stop Sarah before she kills again.

About Teri:

Teri Polen reads and watches horror, sci-fi, and fantasy.  The Walking Dead, Harry Potter, and anything Marvel-related are likely to cause fangirl delirium.  She lives in Bowling Green, KY with her husband, sons, and black cat.  Sarah, a YA horror/thiller, is her first novel.  Visit her online at www.teripolen.com

Connect with Teri:

Website:  www.teripolen.com

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/TPolen6

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TeriPolenAuthor/?ref=bookmarks

Goodreads:  https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16114393.Teri_Polen

Buy Teri’s Book:

Amazon:  https://www.amazon.com/Sarah-Teri-Polen-ebook/dp/B01NBIFRF4/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1484614921&sr=8-1

Barnes & Noble:  http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/sarah-teri-polen/1125171739?ean=9781612967912

Black Rose Writing:  http://www.blackrosewriting.com/childrens-booksya/sarah

A Perfect 10 with Deby Fredericks

A Perfect 10 with Deby Fredericks

Today we sit down with prolific author Deby Fredericks. She has published fiction under her own name and has produced work for children under the name Lucy D. Ford.

Please enjoy her responses to these 10 questions and check out her work in this edition of A Perfect 10.

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. Flory, Steve Boseley, Kayla Matt, Mae Clair, Jill Sammut, Deanna Kahler, Dawn Reno Langley, John Howell, Elaine Cougler, Jan Sikes, Nancy Bell, Nick Davis, Kathleen Lopez, Susan Thatcher, Charles Yallowitz, Armand Rosamilia, Tracey Pagana, Anna Dobritt, Karen Oberlaender

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


Deby Fredericks1) Does writing energize or exhaust you?

For me, it’s more a case of having fun vs. not having fun. I start stories with a framework, but then I start the writing without too much of a plan. It feels fresher and more interesting to discover the characters and events as I go along.

What does energize me is when I make appearances. For me that means either in-person signings or panel discussions at science fiction conventions. Conventions especially are an environment full of friends and exciting images or impressions. So those give me a kick to keep on writing.

2) Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not, have you considered it? Why or why not?

I write fantasy for both kids and adults. When potential readers look at my books I don’t want them to be confused about what sort of book it is. That’s why I use a pseudonym, Lucy D. Ford, for my children’s writing. My friends and family know me as Deby Fredericks, so that’s the name I use for my other writing.

3) Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

This business requires toughness and mental endurance. Having a strong sense of confidence helps a lot when rejections come in. Someone without an ego will find it really painful to go on.

At the same time, nobody likes to deal with a person who’s so egotistical that there’s no respect for the needs of others. The most successful writers are friendly and approachable with fans.

4) What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

My first name, Deby, is spelled in an unusual way, so I had a nameplate made at a local trophy and engraving shop. It was the best $18 I ever spent. My name is always spelled correctly and my nameplate doesn’t get crumpled in my bag as I go from panel to panel at events.

5) What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

This is a really tricky question for me. I used to have the same vision everyone does, of being published in New York and writing book after book in a comfortable relationship with my editor. What I’ve learned is that almost nobody has that kind of relationship. Publishing is changing so quickly, and the market pressures seem to make everyone expendable. Very senior editors can be kicked to the curb, as can authors who sell well but just aren’t blockbusters.

All writers have to continually re-evaluate what success might look like, and I have to honestly confess that I don’t know what success will look like. I do know that I’m still writing, and still submitting, and I will keep on keeping on until something happens to make me stop.

6) What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

One reason that I usually do self-created fantasy settings is that I stops people saying “It wasn’t really that way!” Okay, sure, in the real world maybe orange trees are severely damaged by frost. In my own fantasy world, I can have special, magical orange trees that thrive on the icy tundra if I wish to. So there!

Seriously, I do most of the research as I build my fantasy world. Things will appear that I’m not sure of, like how Polynesian peoples built their boats, and I’ll glance at Wikipedia for enough information to build that into the world.

Once I have a rough idea of my setting, I tend to start writing. As I go, I make a list of questions that pop up. Before I do the second draft is when I get library books and follow up on those items.

7) How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

My personal obsession is to make sure all the names sound like they belong in the same place and time. It bugs me when you have Lizzie and Mike and Xoggorovbottch all in the same story. It also bugs me when an author gives their character a long, lovely name like Christalaina and then go through the whole thing calling them “Chris.”

I’ve never gotten all the way through to publication with a character whose name is wrong. If the name is off, I’ll usually realize that part way through, and I’ll change the name mid-stream. Then of course I have to warn my critique partners that the name changes!

8) What is the hardest type of scene to write?

I have a hard time with battle scenes. I tend to hem and haw before getting started. Not being a fighter myself, I always feel like there’s too much thinking in the middle of the action. The dividing line between concentrating on the action and fully describing the scene gets to me.

9) If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

I would invite Ursula LeGuin, Alice (Andre) Norton, Anne McCaffrey and Patricia McKillip over for coffee and just listen to their stories about the business and challenges they overcame during their careers.

10) What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

In terms of selling books and knowing I actually sold them, it’s been book signings where I greet customers and talk to them about the stories. Now that I’m self-publishing, it’s harder to gauge the success of online friendships and networking. Like my version of “success,” it’s a work in progress.

AuntUrsula'sAtlasAunt Ursula’s Atlas

On a high shelf, in a hidden library,
There is a book of unknown wonders.

Open its pages. Explore mysterious lands.
See for yourself what lies within
Aunt Ursula’s Atlas.

Purchase hub on Draft 2 Digital: HERE
Connects to Apple, Nook, Kobo, Scribd, 24 Symbols, Inktera, Angus & Robertson

Amazon: HERE

About Deby Fredericks:

Deby Fredericks has been a writer all her life, but thought of it as just a fun hobby until the late 1990s. Her first sale, a children’s poem, was in 2000. She has six fantasy novels in print through two small presses. The latest is The Grimhold Wolf, from Sky Warrior Books. She also writes for children under the byline Lucy D. Ford. Her poetry and short stories have appeared in magazines such as Boys’ Life, Cricket, Spider, and Ladybug. Her middle-grade fantasy, Masters of Air & Fire, is available from Sky Warrior Books.

Connect with Deby:

Web Site: www.debyfredericks.com

Blog: wyrmflight.wordpress.com

A Perfect 10 with Karen Oberlaender

A Perfect 10 with Karen Oberlaender

This week’s edition of A Perfect 10 features author Karen Obelaender. Karen tells us about her work and her inspiration.

Please enjoy this edition of A Perfect 10.

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. Flory, Steve Boseley, Kayla Matt, Mae Clair, Jill Sammut, Deanna Kahler, Dawn Reno Langley, John Howell, Elaine Cougler, Jan Sikes, Nancy Bell, Nick Davis, Kathleen Lopez, Susan Thatcher, Charles Yallowitz, Armand Rosamilia, Tracey Pagana, Anna Dobritt

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


KarenDoes writing energize or exhaust you?

Writing is rather energizing for me. As soon as the adrenaline kicks in, my writing juices are unstoppable – slight timeouts for coffee or the co-editing felines are always possible without interrupting the flow.

Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

There was never a need to use a pseudonym:

  1. a) I do not write anything I would be ashamed of.
  2. b) Most of my readers are spread around the globe; only a handful of them are in my vicinity.

Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

As nothing is ever completely positive or negative, the answer definitely is that it can hurt and help. A big ego helps in marketing one’s work, get in touch with everyone, believe in own capabilities. A big ego can hurt, though. Marketing and contacting others could be exaggerated; most of us are not fond of being hassled. Bragging about one’s capabilities is not well-liked either, it is way too easy to be categorized a show-off.

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

As a writer, I spent the best money for – my computer. It is fast, has a big enough screen, and simply is ideal to work with. Other devices like tablets and smartphones are also used for minor tasks, my writing needs to be done on my computer.

What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

As I am not a full-time writer, writing success means that at least one reader likes my writing and – ideally leaves a review. More than one reader liked my stories; there haven’t been any reviews, yet. This means that I have not achieved my full writing success up to now.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

Research can be quite simply browsing Google Maps for a certain location or checking a bus schedule. In some cases, I searched in biographies to check if, when, and how two persons met. Depending on a story set, it is wise to read local papers, current and older editions, talk to the locals, etc.

Time spent for research so far was in a range between twenty minutes and a week.

How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

If I was inspired by a dream, I use that name. In other cases, there is a story idea first; I have a rough plot line, adding characters (two-legged and/or four-legged) and their names comes easy, flowing from my mind through the keyboard in my story. No naming regrets so far. If a name does not fit – it can be adapted.

What is the hardest type of scene to write?

Romantic scenes are the hardest to write. They take the longest because I debate with myself endlessly if they are way too sober. Luckily my husband is a great in steering me in the right direction.

If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

This would be an interesting scenario! I would love to have dinner with the (14th) Dalai Lama, Craig Boyack, Ali Isaac, and a Chinese cook my husband and I met in Bavaria (we discussed tolerance, peace, and compassion for at least two hours). We would chat, laugh, and I would ask them what makes them happy and – what we could do to achieve/support peace on Earth.

Cover_InASmallCompass_1What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

This question is difficult, as I only published one book so far. Most downloads were due to my daughter’s efforts; many due to my posts on my two WordPress blogs – thanks to my wonderful friends and readers.

Links:

Blog:  https://mytrainofthoughtson.wordpress.com/

Blog:  https://inasmallcompass.wordpress.com/

Smashwords:  https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/okiewashere

Goodreads:  https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16149973.Karen_Oberlaender

AuthorsDB:  http://authorsdb.com/community/profile/6832-karen-oberlaender

Buy/download links:  http://books2read.com/u/m0zodW

twitter:  https://twitter.com/okiewashere

 

 

 

A Perfect 10 with Anna Dobritt

A Perfect 10 with Anna Dobritt

This week I have the distinct pleasure of featuring blogger and author Anna Dobritt. Anna is one of the most supportive people in the blogosphere. Her blog is a combination of helpful tips, inspiring quotes and good storytelling. She is also very generous with reblogging helpful posts from others.

I hope you enjoy this edition of A Perfect 10 with Anna Dobritt.

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. Flory, Steve Boseley, Kayla Matt, Mae Clair, Jill Sammut, Deanna Kahler, Dawn Reno Langley, John Howell, Elaine Cougler, Jan Sikes, Nancy Bell, Nick Davis, Kathleen Lopez, Susan Thatcher, Charles Yallowitz, Armand Rosamilia, Tracey Pagana

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


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  • Does writing energize or exhaust you?

It does both. Sometimes I get into a zone and write for several hours straight, and after that all I want to do is rest.

  • Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

No. I use my own name. If I were to switch to a different genre like westerns or historical novels, I would use a pseudonym.

  • Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

I think it hurts having a big ego since that sets you apart from your readers and potential readers.  These are the people you are trying to connect with through your writing.

  • What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Three editing programs and Scrivener.

  • What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

People asking to read more of your work. I haven’t quite achieved that.

  • What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

For my first trilogy, I used the interest for research since I just needed to look up some information I needed. So there trilogy I am working on,  I have about fifty eBooks on my Kindle for research purposes.

  • How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name?

Why? I like unusual names for my main character like Ravyn Wyng and Lenara Lenquil. I have never regretted any names I have used.

  • What is the hardest type of scene to write?

Emotional scenes. I still struggle writing those.

  • If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

Nikola Tesla,  Edgar Cayce, Edward Leedskalnin, and Plato. I would ask them about Atlantis and where they think it was located and what were the people like.

  • What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

Using the various Facebook groups for promoting my books.

Find Anna’s Book:

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Book Link: HERE.

Connect with Anna:

https://amdobritt.com

https://www.facebook.com/authoramdobritt/

A Perfect 10 with Tracey Pagana

A Perfect 10 with Tracey Pagana

Today we sit down with Tracey Pagana to talk about her work and her inspiration. Please enjoy this edition of A Perfect 10.

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. Flory, Steve Boseley, Kayla Matt, Mae Clair, Jill Sammut, Deanna Kahler, Dawn Reno Langley, John Howell, Elaine Cougler, Jan Sikes, Nancy Bell, Nick Davis, Kathleen Lopez, Susan Thatcher, Charles Yallowitz, Armand Rosamilia

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


Tracey 1

  • Does writing energize or exhaust you?

I think I would have to say both words apply to that question for me.  The energizing part is the healing and journey and the ability to have had the opportunity to write about it. The exhausting part was the personal story and life lessons. Hanging out my laundry and being exposed was exhausting during the process.

  • Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

No my book is a personal healing story and journey so I thought best for the type of book it is to use my identity.  However in saying this of course I have changed names to protect the identity of people who share in the book.

  • Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

I think that ego is imperative for an author; healthy ego creates positive attitude and healthy self-esteem.  In my case I check my ego at the door and write from my soul’s perspective and then pick my ego up and check on its perspective. When the two agree I am satisfied with the message of my writing.

  • What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Without a doubt my editor and the publishing company who completed the project.

  • What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

I think success for me is in the moments I live my life.  So the fact that I wrote a book was successful all on its own merit.  Writing a book has never been a dream or a long unfulfilled desire. The success has already happened in the process of the writing and in the testimonials I am receiving.  My message is one of self-love staring from your own innerspace.

  • What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before

I did not do very much research on the book.  The bit of research that I did do was on explaining the origin of Reiki a form of hands on healing. The only other research was on the Chackra system that Reiki works in conjunction with when practicing. The other research was to explain senses used from a soul’s perspective called cog-nonsense

  • When you are beginning a book, what sources do you use?

My life experiences and the two worlds I am familiar with worldly education, soul education

  • How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

This question does not apply to my writing

  • What is the hardest type of scene to write?

Probably the personal experiences and the truth leaving me somewhat naked and vulnerable!

  • If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

Dr.-Wayne-Dryer-520

Dr. Wayne Dyer – How can I continue to love the masses of people with the same passion, consistency, and vitality! I have asked you to write through me in spirit form and I miss your presence but still feel you as strong as ever!

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Elvis – Can you explain why you had so much more than most and why you seemed so sad at the end of your life? Did you really die or were you just too tired and gave it all up for peace and lived a very long time incognito?

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Mother Teresa – How hard was it to witness what you did day in and day out? Did you ever feel like you were having a day that the heavens opened up and your heart was just for the day full of joy pain free?

Madonna

Madonna– I just think you were and still probably misunderstood?  Maybe even judged. You intrigue people you have a way about you that connects to all, not all good, not all bad ….just connections   very powerful tool to reach many if you wanted too!

  • What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

Probably, at this point, myself and own driving passion, energy, the mission I feel called to… reaching people with a message of love.  Same message just a different messenger. We do however have; thanks to the people who believed in me, a very professional package and product.  We are almost ready to use our web domain and have had a videographer work with a trailer. I have new clients based on the messages as well as new people reading the book and listening to the CD (music I recorded years ago related to the story in the book) The marketing will continue as we will have hard copies and CD for purchase in book stores as well as pay pal and on line purchases.

Check out Tracey’s Book: Innerspace cover PRINT

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A Perfect 10 with Armand Rosamilia

A Perfect 10 with Armand Rosamilia

This week, A Perfect 10 features author Armand Rosamilia. Armand is living proof that you can write in multiple genres and have success. I had the pleasure of meeting him in person at a mini comic book convention in Jacksonville, Florida just by chance. My daughter made A/B honor roll and her chosen reward is to go to the comic book store. There happened to be vendor booths with artists, authors and gamers on the day we chose to go and Armand was among them. It was a pleasure meeting him and I hope you enjoy his thoughts as he answers the usual 10 questions.

Please enjoy this edition of A Perfect 10.

Side note: I wasn’t able to travel back to Jacksonville this past weekend due to thousands of flights cancelled and rescheduled in Atlanta. I would have ended up getting home and turning around to leave within a day and a half. I opted to stay in Albuquerque. All of my interview files are in Florida. Armand was gracious enough to resend his interview questionnaire to me along with his materials. You might notice a different header image on this week’s post. I don’t have my usual picture, but I kind of like this one better. (I know, TMI)

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. Flory, Steve Boseley, Kayla Matt, Mae Clair, Jill Sammut, Deanna Kahler, Dawn Reno Langley, John Howell, Elaine Cougler, Jan Sikes, Nancy Bell, Nick Davis, Kathleen Lopez, Susan Thatcher, Charles Yallowitz

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


armand rosamilia

  • Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Both! It can beat you up some days when you’re struggling to find the next word to write, when the deadlines are looming and you’re really behind, and when you’re just not feeling it. Then you get the days where you skip lunch because you’re so in the zone or you look up and you’ve burned six straight hours working and it feels like six minutes. The ideas are flowing and you never want it to end.

  • Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

I’ve written some erotica in the past I used a pen-name for since I didn’t want it associated with my catalog of books to confuse anyone. I’ve also done some ghostwriting of novels and my name was not used. Most of my work is written under my name, though.

  • Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

You need an ego and believing in yourself to succeed… but too much of an ego is a bad thing and a turnoff for potential readers and your peers. I absolutely believe I am a great writer and I will succeed, but I know I’m not the best and need to keep working at this.

  • What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

First date dinner with the woman who became my wife. In the four years we’ve known each other she has helped me so much with the business end of this career. I’m creative and disorganized and uncaring when it comes to the money part of this but she’s really taken control and helped me with shortcuts and strategies to let me grow as an author and not stress about the little stuff.

  • What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

I have. I’ve been a full-time author for the past six years. I’m able to travel and not stress over money anymore. I can write and promote and do what I love and never put pants on unless someone is coming over for dinner. This is living the dream.

  • What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

I don’t do a ton of research. I just start writing a story and if it needs something specific I’ll Google it right then but give myself only 20-30 minutes to research so I don’t fall into the trap of spending the day on the internet reading about everything and anything. I’d rather go back in edits and add to it but most of the time I’ve given enough or know enough about a subject I can get by. I never want a reader to be drawn out of a story because they question some fact or have to look it up, or there is so much info-dump about it the story is compromised.

  • How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

I’m not someone who bangs my head against the wall, looking for the perfect name. I think the best ones are those you don’t have to think about too long. Sometimes I’ll have a few names in my head waiting for some personality. I try not to use like-sounding names if possible but I’ve written a couple hundred stories in my life so it gets hard to remember which names were ever used. I did use the name of a woman once and after the story was published we had a falling out… so I killed her, I mean the character, in the sequel.

  • What is the hardest type of scene to write?

For me it is something that is taken out of my real life. A scene that is personal for me. Sometimes, as I’m working on a story, the scene calls for an emotion or imagery I know is close to something I’ve experienced. I’ve accepted I can’t fight it and just roll with it, but at times it really knocks you for a loop because it brings up painful memories.

  • If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

I’d want to have dinner with Dean Koontz, Robert E. Howard, H.P. Lovecraft and Brian Lumley. Four authors who changed everything for me as a kid growing up with great stories that made me want to become an author. I’d pick their brains about how they started and the mistakes and triumphs in their careers.

  • What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

Honestly, just being myself. I learned a long time ago readers weren’t interested in a hard sell for a book. They wanted to find an author they could not only read but have a conversation with. I’ve always tried to be friendly and have some fun with this career. It really beats getting a ‘real’ job. The authors I looked up to on my way into this took the time to chat with me, offer suggestions and just be normal. I try to do the same and I think it works.

 Armand’s Books:

dirdty deeds 1Dirty Deeds

I get paid to erase problems.

Did your extramarital affair produce an unwanted complication? Family problems? Just want to enjoy your midlife crisis by yourself?

That’s where I come in. For a fee I’ll take care of it. A big fee.

Only, I’m not going to do what you think. I’m not going to save you from them, I’m going to save them from you.

 Find Dirty Deeds HERE

dirty deeds 2Dirty Deeds 2

Everything was going smoothly until my past caught up with me.

Now I’m being taunted by a madman who know more about me than I do.

He’s kidnapped the closest person in my life, and he is using it to get my attention.

Trust me… he has it. Now I just need to figure out where he is and when he’ll strike again.

Things were easier when I was only kidnapping children.

Find Dirty Deeds 2 HERE.

 Dirty Deeds by ARDirty Deeds 3

Philadelphia. City of Brotherly Love.

Unless you have the Philly mob trying to kill you and the FBI wanting to sit you down for an interview about your connections to organized crime.

Not to mention being wanted for your own illegal business ventures.

Did you guess I was in trouble?

Find Dirty Deeds 3 HERE.

About Armand:

Armand Rosamilia is a New Jersey boy currently living in sunny Florida, where he writes when he’s not sleeping. He’s happily married to a woman who helps his career and is supportive, which is all he ever wanted in life…

He’s written over 150 stories that are currently available, including horror, zombies, contemporary fiction, thrillers and more. His goal is to write a good story and not worry about genre labels.

He not only runs two successful podcasts…

Arm Cast: Dead Sexy Horror Podcast – interviewing fellow authors as well as filmmakers, musicians, etc.

The Mando Method Podcast with co-host Chuck Buda – talking about writing and publishing

But he owns the network they’re on, too! Project Entertainment Network

He also loves to talk in third person… because he’s really that cool.

You can find him at http://armandrosamilia.com for not only his latest releases but interviews and guest posts with other authors he likes!

and e-mail him to talk about zombies, baseball and Metal:

armandrosamilia@gmail.com