12 Writing Moments You Never Get Tired Of

Check out this post from the Novelty Revisions blog with 12 Writing Moments You Never Get Tired Of

Novelty Revisions

1. Getting so excited about an idea that you completely lose all sense of reality and time.

2. Crying over having to say goodbye to your characters.

3. Having that rare but welcome “I might actually have a really good idea” moment.

4. Finishing a big project. You feel relieved … but terrified? It’s a lot of emotion, but you’re also completely numb. And it’s awesome.

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Smorgasbord Cafe and Bookstore – Meet the Authors – #Humour Andrew Joyce, #Horror #Fantasy Julia Benally, #Thriller Iain Kelly

It’s time to meet the authors at the Smorgasbord Cafe and Bookstore featuring Andrew Joyce, Julia Benally, Iain Kelly

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

There are over 150 authors in the Cafe and Bookstore and I wanted to keep it to key pieces of information such as buying links, recent review, website and covers. However, I know that readers also like to know more about the background of authors.

In this series during June and July I will share the bios of all the authors in the cafe in a random selection. I hope that this will introduce you to the authors in more depth and encourage you to check out their books and follow them on their blog and Twitter.

Meet Andrew Joyce

61uytgjxb0l-_ux250_Andrew Joyce left home at seventeen to hitchhike throughout the US, Canada, and Mexico. He wouldn’t return from his journey until years later when he decided to become a writer. Joyce has written seven books. His first novel, Redemption: The Further Adventures of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer, was awarded…

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Wednesday Writing — Adding Animals

Check out this post from Teagan’s Books blog with the topic: Wednesday Writing — Adding Animals

Teagan's Books

Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Egyptian Mau, Wikipedia (altered image)Egyptian Mau, Wikipedia (altered image)

Welcome to my sanctuary.  This post has gone to the… cats.  It seems the felines have gotten inside. If you’re a cat hater, then you might as well leave right now.  

It’s really hard for me to not share about my novel in progress — particularly since that is what encourages me most. Maybe that’s why I’m so far behind on it.  It’s summer, and I hoped to be finished with the writing by now.  Instead I’m barely half finished.  So, I’m compromising with myself, by talking about adding animals to stories. 

Why Use Animals?

I really can’t say why, but I’ve almost always included animals in my stories. I didn’t even think about it.  Then one day I was reading something and it occurred to me that the world of that story seemed “sterile.”  There were plenty of scenes set…

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The 10 Habits You Must Develop Before You Can Finish Writing a Book

Check out this post from the Novelty Revisions blog with The 10 Habits You Must Develop Before You Can Finish Writing a Book

Novelty Revisions

1. Listening to your body and mind. You can’t write when you’re not fully functional. Writing is important, but so is not writing every once in a while.

2. Treating your writing time like it’s a “real” job — which means actually writing when you say you’re going to, making checklists, and creating and holding yourself to your own deadlines.

3. Engaging in positive (but realistic) self-talk. Some days, “You’re going to write 500 words gosh darn it! I believe in you!” is going to push you over that edge and help you reach that day’s small but mighty goal.

4. Sticking to a pre-planned writing schedule. Even if you don’t “think” you’re the kind of person who needs to plan in advance, big long-term projects often require it anyway. Make it a habit — even if you don’t always like it.

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Turmoil

Check out this post from C.S. Boyack via the Story Empire blog on the subject of turmoil in fiction

Story Empire

Hi gang, Craig here today. One thing good fiction requires is a bit of turmoil. Your main character has to have something unsettling going on in his or her life. I write speculative fiction, so it’s fairly easy to give an example or two.

I could dive right into an alien invasion or zombie apocalypse and have all the turmoil I need. In these examples it’s something the main character never wanted, but now has to come to grips with, maybe even defeat.

Something unwanted might apply in a more realistic setting when settlers have to flee an Indian uprising, or survive a starvation winter because the ships didn’t come.

There are also divorces, loss of employment, sick children, that kind of thing.

Another form of turmoil involves getting what you want, but it turns out to be problematic. Think about that new marriage that leads to her entire family…

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Smorgasbord Cafe and Bookstore – Meet the Authors #Fantasy Deborah Jay, #ParanormalRomance A.J. Alexander, #Historical Ruth Larrea

Check out this post from the Smorgasbord Cafe and Bookstore where you can meet authors Deborah Jay, A.J. Alexander and Ruth Larrea

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

There are over 150 authors in the Cafe and Bookstore and I wanted to keep it to key pieces of information such as buying links, recent review, website and covers. However, I know that readers also like to know more about the background of authors.

In this series during June and July I will share the bios of all the authors in the cafe in a random selection. I hope that this will introduce you to the authors in more depth and encourage you to check out their books and follow them on their blog and Twitter.

Meet Deborah Jay

Deborah Jay writes fantasy and urban fantasy featuring complex, quirky characters and multi-layered plots – just what she likes to read.

Fortunate enough to live not far from Loch Ness in the majestic, mystery-filled Scottish Highlands with her partner and a pack of rescue dogs, she can often be found…

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Smorgasbord Cafe and Bookstore – Author Updates – #Reviews #Historical Noelle Granger, #Shortstories Karen Ingalls, #Thriller Daniel Kemp

Check out these author updates from the Smorgasbord Cafe and Bookstore featuring Noelle Granger, Karen Ingalls and Daniel Kemp

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

The first author today is Noelle Grangerfor her recently released historical novel The Last Pilgrim: The Life of Mary Allerton Cushman

About the book

This book captures and celebrates the grit and struggle of the Pilgrim women who stepped off the Mayflower in the winter of 1620 to an unknown world – one filled with hardship, danger and death. The Plymouth Colony would not have survived without them.

Mary Allerton Cushman was the last surviving passenger of the Mayflower, dying at age 88 in 1699.

Mary’s life is set against the real background of that time. The Last Pilgrim begins from her father’s point of view – she was, after all, only four when she descended into the cramped and dank living space below deck on the Mayflower – but gradually assumes Mary’s voice, as the colony achieves a foothold in the New England’s rocky soil.

What was a…

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Top Ten Things Not to Do When the Globe Theater Burns Down in 1613

John Howell is back with another great top ten list from his Fiction Favorites blog. This one is the TOP TEN THINGS NOT TO DO WHEN THE GLOBE THEATER BURNS DOWN IN 1613

Fiction Favorites

Top Ten Things not to do.

Today marks the 407th anniversary of the burning of the Globe Theater in 1613. If you want to travel back to that time, you better take this list so you won’t inadvertently make a mistake that could cause a tear in the time continuum.

Top Ten Things Not to Do at the Burning of the Globe Theater in 1613.

10 If you go, do not mention that it would not be a significant loss. If you do, at best it will be to someone who doesn’t speak English. At worst, You might be overheard by William Shakespeare himself. (Nice going, Leodegraunce. You wonder why William is so livid? All his plays make their debut at the Globe. Now he will have no venue for performances. Yes, he is getting a pitchfork, and I don’t think he intends to fork hay.)

9 If you go, do not try to tell Tiny…

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The Stories That Call Your Name | The Blank Page

Check out this post from the Novelty Revisions Blog with the topic: The Stories That Call Your Name | The Blank Page

Novelty Revisions

The Blank Page is a new weekly series on Novelty Revisions dedicated to any writer who is just beginning their journey or starting again after a long pause. Check back every Monday for more tips and inspiration.


It was a song that didn’t exist. Yet it kept playing on repeat inside my head.

Over. And over. And over.

This went on for weeks. I went to sleep humming the melody. I woke up with it ringing in my ears. Who knows — it could have even become the soundtrack to my dreams.

Finally I couldn’t take it anymore. Humming into my phone’s microphone just wasn’t going to cut it. I reached for my violin, something I hadn’t done in weeks because the world was on fire and I couldn’t deal — and struggled through my inexperience as a beginner to get that melody out of the constant cycle of my…

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Smorgasbord Cafe and Bookstore – Meet the Authors – #Mystery #Romance Alex Craigie, #Children Dawn Doig, #Humour Linda G. Hill

Check out this post from the Smorgasbord Cafe and Bookstore featuring authors Alex Craigie, Dawn Doig and Linda G. Hill

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

There are over 150 authors in the Cafe and Bookstore and I wanted to keep it to key pieces of information such as buying links, recent review, website and covers. However, I know that readers also like to know more about the background of authors.

In this series during June and July I will share the bios of all the authors in the cafe in a random selection. I hope that this will introduce you to the authors in more depth and encourage you to check out their books and follow them on their blog and Twitter.

Meet Alex Craigie

Alex Craigie was ten when her first play was performed at school. It was in rhyming couplets and written in pencil in a book with imperial weights and measures printed on the back.

When her children were young, she wrote short stories for magazines before returning to the teaching job…

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