A Perfect 10 with Alethea Kehas

This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Author Alethea Kehas  for this edition of A Perfect 10.

Please enjoy this week’s installment of A Perfect 10

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. FlorySteve BoseleyKayla MattMae ClairJill SammutDeanna KahlerDawn Reno LangleyJohn HowellElaine CouglerJan SikesNancy BellNick DavisKathleen LopezSusan ThatcherCharles YallowitzArmand RosamiliaTracey PaganaAnna DobrittKaren OberlaenderDeby FredericksTeri PolenDarlene FosterRobert Rayner, C.C. NaughtonSherry RentshlerLinda BradleyLuna St. ClairJoan HallStaci TroiloAllan HudsonRobert EggletonPaul Scott BatesP.C. ZickJoy LennickPatrick RolandMary CarlomagnoKathleen JowittMichele Jones, J. Bliss, Maline Carroll


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Does writing energize or exhaust you?

This really depends. There are some days when the flow is not happening and it feels forced, or just plain stuck. Then, for sure, writing can feel like a chore and draining. I think this is why I tend to take my time, and use the luxury of waiting until I feel inspired and creative before I sit down to write. When I do this, I find writing to be wonderfully energizing.

Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

No. Unless I was being paid to ghost-write, I don’t feel the need.

Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

This is an interesting question, and on the surface, it would appear the easy answer is “yes.” When someone is bold and proud of his or her writing, there’s nothing really holding it back. Self-promotion is likely to be effortless and fun for that person. That said, though, I tend to think the ego often leads to trouble, and ultimately the work must speak for itself.

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Probably getting my MFA. I don’t think it’s at all necessary to pursue an MFA if one wants to write books, but for me it was the push I needed to actually start writing, really writing, creatively. Plus, I just loved the whole experience. I went to Goddard, which is a rather nontraditional school, met some pretty wonderful people, talked to ghosts, and learned that I could channel energy. It was not only an immersion into the writing life, but a spiritual awakening of sorts. My memoir came out of this experience, as well as the impetus to become a healer.

What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

Had you asked me this question a few years ago, I would have told you that it translates to being on the NY Times best seller-list. And, even better, winning a Pulitzer. Now, after going through the writing and self-publication of my first book, I have to say success looks a lot different to me. I’ve come to realize success is very much an inside job. Finding the courage and words to birth these stories, and to speak my truth, then release them into the world feels like I have achieved something monumental. Would I like to have the book widely read and well-received, of course. But, somehow, this is also enough.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

Since first book was a memoir, my research included a lot of delving into my own memories with the aid of scrapbooks and photographs. I quickly realized, though, that I wanted other people’s memories, as I was writing a book about “truth.” I found it fascinating (and often  frustrating) to discover what other people remember and what they chose to forget (whether deliberately or subconsciously, myself included). The very fact that two people can have a completely different memory of the same event is also an interesting exploration. I didn’t ask every character in my book to share memories, which was mostly deliberate. I wanted to shape the narrative in a way that honored my individual journey and truth.

How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

I changed most of the real names in my memoir to protect people’s identity. When I did this I often went with whatever name happened to pop into my head, which sounds rather arbitrary since I hold such credence to the importance of a name. The reader will quickly learn that some of the names, including my own, are integral to the story, the others are simply there to differentiate characters. I suppose I didn’t want to give too much weight to a name that was not “real.”

What is the hardest type of scene to write?

I struggled the most with the brief scene that reveals my earliest memory. It seemed rather simple on the surface. I was only two-years-old when it occurred, so there was not, in essence, much to write, but it was such a crucial moment. It was so emotionally charged and personally defining, I found myself going back to it and trying to get it just right several times.

If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

Well I had a dream a few years ago that I was on Oprah’s show with Elizabeth Gilbert, and I’d rather like that to manifest into reality. Otherwise, there are probably countless people I’d love to sit down with for a meal.

Four others would be Michelle Obama, Jesus, John Lennon, and  L.M. Montgomery. I would ask the first three about their journeys and definition of Truth. I’d ask L.M. Montgomery to tell me about her dreams.

What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

I’m just starting out, so I’m not so sure if I can give a fair answer to this question yet.

Alethea’s Books:

AGNT_CoverThumbA Girl Named Truth is currently available on Amazon and amazon.co.uk, as well as Gibson’s Bookstore in Concord, N.H. Signed copies can be purchased directly through me by emailing aekehas@gmail.com.

Connect with Alethea:

My website is: https://aletheakehas.com

I blog at: https://nottomatoes.wordpress.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AletheaKehasAuthor

Twitter: https://twitter.com/@AletheaKehas

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/truthheals/

 

 

A Perfect 10 with J. Bliss

This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Author J. Bliss  for this edition of A Perfect 10.

Please enjoy this week’s installment of A Perfect 10

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. FlorySteve BoseleyKayla MattMae ClairJill SammutDeanna KahlerDawn Reno LangleyJohn HowellElaine CouglerJan SikesNancy BellNick DavisKathleen LopezSusan ThatcherCharles YallowitzArmand RosamiliaTracey PaganaAnna DobrittKaren OberlaenderDeby FredericksTeri PolenDarlene FosterRobert Rayner, C.C. NaughtonSherry RentshlerLinda BradleyLuna St. ClairJoan HallStaci TroiloAllan HudsonRobert EggletonPaul Scott BatesP.C. ZickJoy LennickPatrick RolandMary CarlomagnoKathleen JowittMichele JonesMaline Carroll


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Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Writing gives me life. It is my very breath, so I would have to say yes writing energizes me or more so electrifies me.

Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

Yes…I decided to because I am a versatile writer of multiple genres. I would not want a minor to seek the material I write that is adult literature.

Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

Having a healthy ego is key! A healthy ego is a driven force to success; it challenges the individual to perform at his/her best. Attaining a healthy ego is a motivator to others; the person with a healthy ego presents themselves as confident which inspires another to pursue their goals in life.

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

I was doing research to put a novel together and many scenes would take place there. As a result, I went to Paris, lived as a Parisian and attained much information. It was a life changing experience.

What does writing success look like to you?

Being able to write with the financial stability to publish each project so the material can be published and shared with others. Have you achieved it? No, I have not…it is a work in progress.  It takes time for any dream, to build relationships with readers, and to secure funds. I see myself attaining the success, so I push forward knowing it will one day be a reality.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

It can take me up to two years to do research depending upon what I am going to write. I research education, human rights, current events, relationships, I study people, the way the act, the reason they make decisions as they do, divorce, law, abuse, etc…and how such events impact a person’s mind frame.

I research relationships, sex, food, cultures, and people in general.  The research helps me prepare the stage, to see the current events in my mind so I may paint the words on paper.

How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

I select names by way of finding symbolic meaning to the character. In my recent book the main male character is Andrew Rodd. In the Bible, one of the first apostles chosen was Andrew. His first name is captured biblically, meaning manly, brave. His name carries the trait of one of revelation and spiritual insight. His last name is a play on word and symbolic of his body in a sensual manner. Even his nickname, Drew is from the Greek origin meaning wise and manly. I thought it would be most fitting to have the first male character as Andrew Rodd, an alpha male; presented in the first installment of the chance series. The young lady character is Jasmine Chance. Her first name means elegance, grace. Biblically it means gift from God. Then there are the many other things such as flowers, fragrances etc…the name Jasmine is connected to. I purposely selected the names based on the type of book, and couple I was joining together in what I like to reference as Drew’s world. The couple is displayed as lovers of fate story. I thought it makes sense to name them what I selected based on the presentation of their relationship.

What is the hardest type of scene to write?

I have yet to discover.

If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

Prince, Kate Chopin, W.E. Dubois and Josephine Baker.  I don’t know if there is one question I would ask rather, I would study them and want to be in their presence. Being around them would answer questions without proposing the question.

What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

I am still working on that aspect of marketing. I would have to say Facebook to this date. It allows me to schedule and build relationships with readers.

About J. Bliss:

J Bliss Press Kit Info

About J. Bliss’s Books:

A Perfect 10 with Maline Carroll

This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Author Maline Carroll  for this edition of A Perfect 10.

Please enjoy this week’s installment of A Perfect 10

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. FlorySteve BoseleyKayla MattMae ClairJill SammutDeanna KahlerDawn Reno LangleyJohn HowellElaine CouglerJan SikesNancy BellNick DavisKathleen LopezSusan ThatcherCharles YallowitzArmand RosamiliaTracey PaganaAnna DobrittKaren OberlaenderDeby FredericksTeri PolenDarlene FosterRobert Rayner, C.C. NaughtonSherry RentshlerLinda BradleyLuna St. ClairJoan HallStaci TroiloAllan HudsonRobert EggletonPaul Scott BatesP.C. ZickJoy LennickPatrick RolandMary CarlomagnoKathleen Jowitt, Michele Jones


Maline CarrollDoes writing energize or exhaust you?

Energizes me

Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

Yes, I write under a pseudonym because I feel it is important to protect myself. I am also able to straddle two different worlds.

Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

I think it depends on what the ego is all about. I feel good when people tell me my writing is good or has impacted them. That encourages me to continue to write.

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Buying book written by adoptees

What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

Writing success looks like others writing about your writing. Yes, I have achieved it.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

Recently I’ve been writing only on things I am familiar with. My first kids book required some research about Haiti’s earthquake but most of what I wrote about included my lived experience.

How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

I try to make the name of the character fit the country, language and culture. Most of the stuff I have written focuses on the lived experiences of others, so realistic fiction. I choose character names based on their personalities.

What is the hardest type of scene to write?

A rape scene

If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

Barack Obama, Michelle Obama, God and her Majesty, Oprah Winfrey. I would ask them how their choices today were shaped by their lived experiences.

What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

Facebook and Twitter

Maline’s Book:

Book cover

The Perks Of Being An Adoptee

https://www.createspace.com/7152470

Connect with Maline:

Twitter, Instagram, FB: Nooma Consulting

Blog: www.solifegoeson.com

 

A Perfect 10 with Michele Jones

This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Author Michele Jones for this edition of A Perfect 10.

Please enjoy this week’s installment of A Perfect 10

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. FlorySteve BoseleyKayla MattMae ClairJill SammutDeanna KahlerDawn Reno LangleyJohn HowellElaine CouglerJan SikesNancy BellNick DavisKathleen LopezSusan ThatcherCharles YallowitzArmand RosamiliaTracey PaganaAnna DobrittKaren OberlaenderDeby FredericksTeri PolenDarlene FosterRobert Rayner, C.C. NaughtonSherry RentshlerLinda BradleyLuna St. ClairJoan HallStaci TroiloAllan HudsonRobert EggletonPaul Scott BatesP.C. ZickJoy LennickPatrick RolandMary Carlomagno, Kathleen Jowitt

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


Jones, Michele Head Shot

Does writing energize or exhaust you?

At times, both. Days that I write about a character dying or getting seriously hurt are tough, whereas days that I work on a happy scene give me great pleasure and energy.

Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

I write under my own name. I would consider writing under a pseudonym if I wrote erotica, I wouldn’t want that to be associated with my preferred genre or identity as a fiction author.

Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

I believe it can do both. You are your best promoter, but if you go over the top, you can turn people off.

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Scrivener. The many features it provides keep all my project pieces in one place.

What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

If someone tells you they enjoy your writing and hope you write more, that is success. If they say it touched them, or they could relate to my characters, that is success. Yes, I have achieved that.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

My research depends on what I am writing. Once I have decided on the plot and have done a brief outline, I start my research. The complexity of topic will determine the amount of research. I spend hours researching and compiling notes. I write fiction, but it needs to be believable to the reader and the content needs to be accurate. I use several sources, but Google is my main resource. If I know someone that has experience in the topic, I contact them as well.

How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

I choose my names based on the ethnicity of my characters, the time period that I am writing about, how I wish to portray my character, and setting I place my characters in. I look on line, sometimes I hear a name that I like, and I have used Google to find what I need. I never regretted any names that I have chosen. I believe the reason why is that I spend time choosing the name based on the characteristics I have for my characters.

What is the hardest type of scene to write?

The most difficult scene for me to write is a sex scene.

If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

This question is difficult. My family is extremely important to me, and I would love to have a huge family dinner with all of them, living, deceased and future generations. I love listening to their stories, especially since my grandfather came over on the boat from Italy, and I’d like to know that my future generations will be happy.

Having dinner with God would be interesting. I’d like to know his plan for us, how our fate is determined, and why things happen the way they do.

Dinner with the Devil. I’d like to know why. Why influence people to unconscionable things. What makes him do the things he does? Does he get pleasure from it or is it a game to him?

The online author friends that I have met. We are fortunate to live in an age where technology affords us the opportunity to connect online with many individuals. I have virtually met several online authors who have been helpful and supportive to me in many ways. I would enjoy having dinner and meeting them all in person to thank them for all the help and support they have given me and to get to know them better.

What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

I don’t know that one platform has been more effective than any other. I use the same platforms as many other authors. Word of mouth, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, the list goes on. I think luck plays as big a part in success as marketing.

About Michele’s Book:

Romance Under Wraps Michele Jones

About Romance Under Wraps:

Given life every century, the adviser is tasked with teaching the evil pharaoh how to pass the judgments necessary to gain entry to the afterlife. His only chance to move on lies with an evil self-centered mummy that refused to heed his advice. To complicate matters, the gods have given them an out. Find the reincarnated queen and gain her favor. All this and only months to do it. When he finally realizes that he has found the queen, will he have enough time to convince her to love him and break the curse.

Or

The Carnegie Museum of Natural History gets an Egyptian installation, and it seems to come with the ubiquitous mummy’s curse. Death and destruction abound. But the real curse is on the mummy’s adviser—he must teach the mummy how to pass forty-three judgments or find the reincarnated queen and win her love—or they are doomed to continue reawakening every century to try all over again.

Excerpt from Romance Under Wraps:

Tayla couldn’t explain it, but she felt a connection to Dene, like she’d known him all her life. He excited her and made her feel—special? But yet so much more than special. She didn’t want their walk to end. She could feel her face getting hotter, could feel her heart beating faster and knew her ears were burning.

The wind picked up and a light rain started to fall.  She shivered and rubbed her arms for warmth.

“Where are my manners?” He took off his jacket and draped it over her shoulders.

“Thank you.” His cologne enveloped her—earthy, anise, and something else she couldn’t quite place. She closed her eyes and breathed in his scent. So familiar, but nothing commercial. She inhaled again, awash in the smell of him, yet feeling it wasn’t close enough.

She blinked and shook herself aware. “We’re almost there. I’m ahead in the garage on the right. Thank you. I really appreciate it, and I owe you.”

“You do not owe me. I enjoyed the company.”

She pointed to her car. “That’s me. Thank you again for walking me to the car. Can I give you a lift somewhere?” Tayla used her fob to unlock the car. They both reached for the handle at the same time, and his hand brushed hers. Her hand shook, partly from the awkwardness of the moment and partly from the sudden rush of desire she was feeling. She dropped her keys.

They reached for them at the same time, and their hands touched again. She sucked in a breath and exhaled slowly, the keys all but forgotten. Her cheeks grew even hotter as she felt warmth suffusing her belly, curling lower, suggesting lascivious possibilities.

She glanced into his turquoise eyes, flicked a look over his entire body. She noticed the muscles in his arms jumped, and with his cologne tickling her senses, she realized how much she wanted him—all of him—caressing her, kissing her, exploring her secrets.

Her body shook with both a little fear of uncertainty and desire as she moved closer to him. She leaned into him against the car and slid her hands up to his collar. Before she changed her mind, she softly ran her tongue over his lips, gently exploring until her restraint faltered, then crushed her mouth to his. Nothing prepared her for the passionate feelings that overtook her. She pulled back. Her body ached and her heart pounded with need. She gasped for air.

He reached for her again, wrapping his arms around her, pulling her back into the shelter of his arms. She leaned against him when he brushed his lips against her neck. Tayla tilted her head back as Dene began tracing her neck with delicate kisses. The anticipation burned her alive from the inside—she trembled in his arms. She wanted him. Now.

He mimicked her original kiss, following the outline of her lips with his tongue. Unable to deny gratification any longer, she covered his mouth with hers in a passionate kiss—deeper and more searching than the first kiss. A kiss like this was a promise of much more to come.

Tayla broke the kiss. “Oh, oh, I shouldn’t have done that. Forgive me—that was unprofessional and inappropriate. And I’m in a relationship.”  She handed him his jacket, got in her car, and drove off.

About Michele:

Michele Jones lives in Western Pennsylvania with her husband and two spoiled dogs. Along with her writing, family, cooking, and sports are her passions. She is a die-hard Penguin, Steeler, and Pirate fan… really, a die-hard anything-Pittsburgh fan.

Michele writes memoirs, short stories, romance, and poetry, but her passion lies in writing paranormal, suspense, and thrillers. All of her work features strong, capable heroines; dashing, honorable heroes; and dark, dangerous villains embroiled in mysterious, perilous situations to keep readers fascinated from her first word to her last. You can follow her online at www.michele-jones.com.

Connect with Michele:

Twitter: Twitter

Facebook: Facebook

Pinterest: Pinterest

Google +: Google +

LinkedIn: LinkedIn

Goodreads: Goodreads

Amazon Author Page: Amazon Author Page

Instagram:  Instagram

 

A Perfect 10 with Kathleen Jowitt

This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Author Kathleen Jowitt for this edition of A Perfect 10. Hurricane Irma stopped me from running this interview a week ago as scheduled.

Please enjoy this week’s installment of A Perfect 10

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. FlorySteve BoseleyKayla MattMae ClairJill SammutDeanna KahlerDawn Reno LangleyJohn HowellElaine CouglerJan SikesNancy BellNick DavisKathleen LopezSusan ThatcherCharles YallowitzArmand RosamiliaTracey PaganaAnna DobrittKaren OberlaenderDeby FredericksTeri PolenDarlene FosterRobert Rayner, C.C. NaughtonSherry RentshlerLinda BradleyLuna St. ClairJoan HallStaci TroiloAllan HudsonRobert EggletonPaul Scott BatesP.C. ZickJoy LennickPatrick Roland, Mary Carlomagno

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


KJpicDoes writing energize or exhaust you?

At the beginning, it energizes me. Words generate words; I wake up in the night and know exactly what needs to happen next. I’m riding on the top of an exhilarating wave. After a while, the momentum dies away and it becomes more of a slog.

Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

I’ve thought about it, if only for the reason that my middle names would work very well as one! (Adele Fox – it has a certain ring to it, doesn’t it?) But then my own name is very distinctive and I like the idea of keeping all my original work under the same umbrella.

Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

A certain amount of confidence is vital, particularly if one’s going to self-publish. One has to be willing to take responsibility for one’s own work, to say, yes, this is good enough to put out into the world, and there’s no room for false modesty in that. But the other side of that coin is that one also has to look at that same work with a very clear eye, to accept the idea that it might have faults and to do whatever is possible to correct those faults.

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

Membership of the Society of Authors. I don’t think I’d have come across the Betty Trask Prize without being on the mailing list, and that’s really changed everything. Being the first self-published author ever to win a Betty Trask Award gives me a credibility that I’d have had to struggle for otherwise. And they’ve been so supportive ever since.

What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

Producing good quality work, and having others, whose judgement I trust, recognize it. And yes, I’ve been fortunate enough for that to happen. The judges for the Betty Trask Prize were Joanne Harris, Michèle Roberts, and Simon Brett. I spent several weeks in a sort of daze, murmuring, ‘Joanne Harris read my book. Joanne Harris… likes my book!’ Not to mention approval from friends whose taste I share. But really, if I’m not satisfied with the quality of my work, it doesn’t mean anything.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

It depends on the subject matter. Usually it involves a lot of reading around the topic, finding personal accounts by people who have been in comparable situations. I always start out with good intentions about having in-depth knowledge of the subject before I start writing, but very often I find that the research itself prompts scenes or lines to come to my head, so I’m quite likely to be researching and writing at the same time.

How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

Usually I pick names that appeal to me in some way and write the character to suit. I did once have to rename a character because I’d inadvertently chosen the exact same name as a senior member of staff in a future employer.

What is the hardest type of scene to write?

For me, anything descriptive. Dialogue flows naturally, but I have to go back through and put in all the action afterwards. My first drafts all consist of indeterminate colourless blobs engaging in conversations of sparkling wit.

If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

Whoever it was, I’d worry about making a fool of myself! I think I’d get some of the great opera singers together, the ones who died before the age of recording, and ask them to sing. I’d love to know what they really sounded like. Let’s say… Jenny Lind, Maria Malibran, and Farinelli. And I think Julie d’Aubigny would be an interesting dinner guest. Quite apart from being an opera singer, she eloped with a girl from a convent, set the convent on fire, and fought several duels. It might not be the world’s most successful dinner party, but it would definitely be memorable!

What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

Probably Twitter, if only because it’s brought me into contact with authors and bloggers I wouldn’t have met otherwise.

About Kathleen’s Book:

coverEBOOKA new year at the University of Stancester, and Lydia Hawkins is trying to balance the demands of her studies with her responsibilities as an officer for the Christian Fellowship. Her mission: to make sure all the Christians in her hall stay on the straight and narrow, and to convert the remaining residents if possible. To pass her second year. And to ensure a certain secret stays very secret indeed.

When she encounters the eccentric, ecumenical student household at 27 Alma Road, Lydia is forced to expand her assumptions about who’s a Christian to include radical Quaker activist Becky, bells-and-smells bus-spotter Peter, and out (bisexual) and proud (Methodist) Colette. As the year unfolds, Lydia discovers that there are more ways to be Christian – and more ways to be herself – than she had ever imagined.

Then a disgruntled member of the Catholic Society starts asking whether the Christian Fellowship is really as Christian as it claims to be, and Lydia finds herself at the centre of a row that will reach far beyond the campus. Speak Its Name explores what happens when faith, love and politics mix and explode.

More information on the book is available at www.kathleenjowitt.com/speak-its-name

The Amazon links are here (US) http://www.amazon.com/Speak-Its-Name-Kathleen-Jowitt/dp/0993533906 and here (UK) http://www.amazon.co.uk/Speak-its-Name-Kathleen-Jowitt/dp/0993533906/ – there are various other links on Kathleen’s web page.

Connect with Kathleen:

Website: www.kathleenjowitt.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/KathleenJowitt

 

A Perfect 10 with Mary Carlomagno

This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Author Mary Carlomagno for this edition of A Perfect 10.

Please enjoy this week’s installment of A Perfect 10

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. FlorySteve BoseleyKayla MattMae ClairJill SammutDeanna KahlerDawn Reno LangleyJohn HowellElaine CouglerJan SikesNancy BellNick DavisKathleen LopezSusan ThatcherCharles YallowitzArmand RosamiliaTracey PaganaAnna DobrittKaren OberlaenderDeby FredericksTeri PolenDarlene FosterRobert Rayner, C.C. NaughtonSherry RentshlerLinda BradleyLuna St. ClairJoan HallStaci TroiloAllan HudsonRobert EggletonPaul Scott BatesP.C. ZickJoy Lennick, Patrick Roland

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


Resized_20170620_172203

Does writing energize or exhaust you?

Both, I am exhausted while doing it and energized when finished.  A famous writer once said, it feels better to have written, than actually to write.

Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

I have never considered a pseudonym, but it’s not a bad idea, given my last name!

Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?  

I think it can help, because you have to have something that will drive you forward.  Writing is not fun.  Writing a novel is pure torture.

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

My MAC!

What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

I am getting closer.  I began my career as a non-fiction writer, writing what I knew which included how to store shoes and tidy up people’s spice racks.  I was a professional organizer for 12 years and I often wrote on assignment.  My first three books are about organizing and living with less.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

I use my life as source material, but often look at pop culture and for that the Internet is invaluable.  It’s amazing how much you can learn by sitting at your desk.

How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?  

Sometimes I get inspired by people I know.  If I meet an awesome person, I usually want to honor them in a book.  And other times, it is just a random vibe or feeling.

What is the hardest type of scene to write?

Romantic scenes are difficult to get just right.

If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

1dPrince – I would probably not be brave enough to ask him anything. But I would like to hear him speak about anything, He fascinates me!

2dF. Scott Fitzgerald –  I really want to know for sure if Gatsby is based on real people!

3dJane Austen – I think it would be amazing to hear her speak about mannerly England.

PocahontasPocahontas – I would ask her all about what her life, especially her love life!

What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

I think social media has been the most measurable way to sell books.  The interaction with readers is immediate and very satisfying.

About Mary

I am the author of three previous books about organizing, a nationally recognized spokesperson and owner of order (orderperiod.com) a company that helps busy people get organized and live more balanced lives. I have been featured on the Oprah Winfrey Show, NBC’s Today, and National Public Radio. I was born and raised in New Jersey, a state that I love so much that I have never been away for more than two weeks at a time.

About Mary’s Book

BFFH Cover_v4.2 7.38.40 AM

Jersey Girl Jessie DeSalvo has her dream job at one of New York’s top publishing companies. After ten years of hard work the day of her big promotion has arrived. Unfortunately, her company has other ideas. Instead of a corner office, Jessie is handed her pink slip.

Left with little more than her cell phone and an unusable contact list, Jessie retreats to less-than-fashionable Hoboken, New Jersey, to figure out her life—and deal with the attentions of her loving but inquisitive Italian-American family. Then she accidentally stumbles into a career as a professional best friend—by helping friends and strangers straighten out whatever is wrong with their lives. Her jobs include planning the New Jersey wedding of the year and saving a bankrupt rock club in town. Soon, things get complicated when she falls in love with the club manager—and promises an appearance by Bruce Springsteen.

In the end, Jessie realizes that not even “The Boss” can make things right—and that she needs to become her own best friend to be truly happy.

ORDER BEST FRIEND FOR HIRE NOW!

htcartps://www.amazon.com/Best-Friend-Hire-Mary-Carlomagno/dp/1682612600/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1494438499&sr=8-1&keywords=best+friend+for+hire

Connect with Mary

Mary@orderperiod.com

https://www.facebook.com/MaryCarlomagnoauthor/

https://www.facebook.com/BestFriend4Hire/

marycarlomagno.com

Orderperiod.com

 

A Perfect 10 with Patrick Roland

This week, I have the pleasure of featuring Author Patrick Roland for this edition of A Perfect 10.

Please enjoy this week’s installment of A Perfect 10

If you want to check out past interviews, you can find them in the following links:

A.C. FlorySteve BoseleyKayla MattMae ClairJill SammutDeanna KahlerDawn Reno LangleyJohn HowellElaine CouglerJan SikesNancy BellNick DavisKathleen LopezSusan ThatcherCharles YallowitzArmand RosamiliaTracey PaganaAnna DobrittKaren OberlaenderDeby FredericksTeri PolenDarlene FosterRobert Rayner, C.C. NaughtonSherry RentshlerLinda BradleyLuna St. ClairJoan HallStaci TroiloAllan HudsonRobert EggletonPaul Scott BatesP.C. Zick, Joy Lennick

Also, if you are an author and you want to be part of this feature, I still have a few slots open for 2017. You can email me at don@donmassenzio.com


Author PhotoDoes writing energize or exhaust you?

I think it’s a little of both. I think the idea of it sometimes is exhausting, but then once you’ve done it and you have a finished product – something you are really proud of – that’s very energizing. That’s been my experience lately.

Do you ever write under a pseudonym? If not have you considered it? Why or why not?

I don’t and considering what I admit to doing in my book – I go there! – I don’t think I ever would. To me, it takes away the authenticity of what I am trying to do by telling my story. My hope in doing this is really to help the next person who is going through something similar, but if I am not honest about who I am, why would they even connect to me? This whole exercise is about human connection. This is me stripping the walls of fear and shame I built around myself and saying “this is who I am. I got through this and you can too.”

Does a big ego help or hurt writers? Why or why not?

I think ultimately it hurts. I don’t know why anyone would be interested in reading something by someone who wasn’t humble. That doesn’t seem attainable to me. The thing about me is that I’m a very regular guy. Maybe I’ve gotten through some extraordinary circumstances, but there’s nothing about me that makes me any better or any more than anyone else. That’s why I wanted to do this – I wanted people to know it’s possible to move through pain into power. Because it really is. But it would be useless to me if I didn’t try to help the next person.

What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

I haven’t even made any money yet but when I do, I’ll let you know. 😉

What does writing success look like to you? Have you achieved it?

Well there are a number of different ways you could define “success,” and I suppose the most would do so based on popularity or riches, but regardless of whether or not I ever become the next literary sensation, I do feel like a success because I realized a dream. I did something pretty amazing I always wanted to do that was very supported by my community and the people in my life. Even more, this whole process changed me as a person. I’m not even the same guy I was before I wrote this book. I was able to take all this awful stuff that once broke me, find acceptance in all of it and turn it in to this artistic work that is pretty beautiful. So, that does feel like a success.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book? What sources do you use?

Well this particular book was my life. So I guess I spent about 40 years researching it. Every single thing happened. It’s all true. All the pain. All the heartache. All the eventual growth. All the eventual sparkle. The experience, strength and hope is all real.

How do you select the names of your characters? Have you ever regretted choosing a particular name? Why?

With the exception of one chapter, “Wrecking Ball,” all of the names of the people in my book are real. I changed that one because my publisher felt one of the other drug addicts was portrayed negatively so we didn’t want to harm anyone. I also never used my partner’s real name because he wasn’t out so there is no way to identify him. Nor did I identify anyone in his family. I didn’t want to give them any reason to come after me further.

What is the hardest type of scene to write?

The stuff with my mother was the hardest. We had a very toxic relationship during the time period of this particular narrative. Still, she is my mother so I didn’t want to destroy her. She was way worse in earlier drafts of the book and I still went in pretty hard. I had to be honest about our relationship though because this is the person that I had the most conflict with during this time that ultimately does the thing that saves me from myself so there had to be some juxtaposition there. Because we did not get along then.

If you could have dinner with four people, living or dead, who would they be and what would you want to ask them?

1-dinnerWell, my first choice is obviously going to be Pack (my deceased partner) because I would pick him over and over again every time. I don’t even know what if ask him because I imagine I’d be really overwhelmed to see him again.

2-dinnerThen I pick my best friend Megan because they never got to meet and that makes me really sad.

3-dinnerMy next selection is Whitney Houston because she has always been my favorite singer and I was supposed to meet her once but she was, um, “busy.” (You can draw your own conclusions on what she was doing there).

4-dinner

Then I would pick Oprah because she could make me a literary superstar, right? Maybe we’d all get a car!

What platform has brought you the most success in marketing your books?

Me. This book is very personal and I’ve had the most success when I directly interact with people who are interested in it. Unfortunately, that isn’t always possible, so I answer questions like these! I hope your readers have gotten a taste of what my sparkle is like and I hope they know how much they sparkle, too!

Find Patrick’s Book:

Cover Design Other formatWebsite: http://unpackedsparkle.com/

Amazon USA: https://www.amazon.com/Unpacked-Sparkle-Story-Grief-Recovery/dp/1944826319

Amazon UK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Unpacked-Sparkle-Story-Grief-Recovery-ebook/dp/B01M5IVU5G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1496607233&sr=8-1&keywords=Unpacked+Sparkle

Connect with Patrick:

Twitter: @Unpackedsparkle

Facebook (both the below)

https://m.facebook.com/LLPBONE?ref=bookmarks

https://m.facebook.com/unpackedsparkle/?ref=bookmarks